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Low Surface Brightness Galaxies
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Title: A Study of Active Galactic Nuclei in Low Surface Brightness Galaxies with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Spectroscopy
Authors: Mei Lin, Yuan Weimin, Dong Xiaobo

Active galactic nuclei (AGN) in low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) have received little attention in previous studies. In this paper, we present detailed spectral analysis of 194 LSBGs from the Impey et al. (1996) APM LSBG sample which have been observed spectroscopically by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 (SDSS DR5). Our elaborate spectral analysis enables us to carry out, for the first time, reliable spectral classification of nuclear activities in LSBGs based on the standard emission line diagnostic diagrams in a rigorous way. Star-forming galaxies are common, as found in about 52% LSBGs. We find, contrary to some of the previous claims, that the fraction of galaxies containing an AGN is significantly lower than that found in nearby normal galaxies of high surface brightness. This is qualitatively in line with the finding of Impey et al. (2001). This result holds true even within each morphological type from Sa to Sc. LSBGs having larger central stellar velocity dispersions, or larger physical sizes, tend to have a higher chance to harbour an AGN. For three AGNs with broad emission lines, the black hole masses estimated from the emission lines are broadly consistent with the well known M-\sigma_\ast relation established for normal galaxies and AGNs.

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Posts: 131433
Date:
LSB galaxies
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Title: Chandra Observations of Nuclear X-ray Emission from Low Surface Brightness Galaxies
Authors: M. Das, C. S. Reynolds, S. N. Vogel, S. S. McGaugh, N. G. Kantharia

We present Chandra detections of x-ray emission from the AGN in two giant Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies, UGC 2936 and UGC 1455. Their x-ray luminosities are 1.8 x 10^{42} ergs/s and 1.1 x 10^{40} ergs/s respectively. Of the two galaxies, UGC 2936 is radio loud. Together with another LSB galaxy UGC 6614 (XMM archival data) both appear to lie above the X-ray-Radio fundamental plane and their AGN have black hole masses that are low compared to similar galaxies lying on the correlation. However, the bulges in these galaxies are well developed and we detect diffuse x-ray emission from four of the eight galaxies in our sample. Our results suggest that the bulges of giant LSB galaxies evolve independently of their halo dominated disks which are low in star formation and disk dynamics. The centers follow an evolutionary path similar to that of bulge dominated normal galaxies on the Hubble Sequence but the LSB disks remain unevolved. Thus the bulge and disk evolution are decoupled and so whatever star formation processes produced the bulges did not affect the disks.

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