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TOPIC: November 2008


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RE: November 2008
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View Ring Nebula at observatory
The University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Behlen Observatory near Mead will be open to the public 7:30 to 10 p.m. on Nov. 7.

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Rocky Kolb, an eminent cosmologist and popular public speaker, will discuss "Mysteries of the Dark Universe" in a lively and engaging talk at the Del Mar Theatre in Santa Cruz on Thursday, November 6, at 7 p.m.

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November 2008 Meteor Shower Information
November 2008 should be full of activity for Meteor Showers. There are four meteor showers happening in our skies. Be on the look out for major activity from the Leonids Meteor Shower.

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The two brightest planets, Jupiter and Venus, draw together low down in the SW at nightfall during November. Both have set by our map times as Andromeda and her famous galaxy stand high in the SE, to the left of the Square of Pegasus, and Orion is rising in the E below Taurus.
We have needed a clear SW horizon to catch the brilliant mag -4.0 Venus after sunset of late. Jupiter, much more distant and fainter at mag -2.1, has been higher and more obvious as it moves from low in the S at nightfall to set in the SW some four hours after the Sun.

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Jupiter, Venus Share the Stage In November
November's bipartisan heavens unveil an evening platform featuring a Jupiter- Venus duet, and the morning program highlights Saturn.
Jupiter and Venus share the southwestern sky at dusk, but seemingly distant from each other. The big gaseous Jupiter is higher in the south-southwest now, and the vivacious Venus is closer to the western horizon. In clear skies, both planets should be easy to find, as Venus is a negative fourth magnitude (very bright). Jupiter, although not as bright as Venus, is seen at a respectable negative second magnitude.

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On November 7th, Daylight Savings Time ends, making the nights much longer, but also the time that we'll have to view the planets will be much longer, too. Enjoy this temporary planet-viewing bonanza. On the 3rd, the waxing (getting bigger) crescent Moon is just to the lower left of Jupiter. On the 13th, we'll have a full Moon. The 27th will produce a new Moon, making the view of Jupiter and Venus (together almost touching) very crisp against the dark sky. During the end of October and throughout most of November, you'll be able to see the Taurid Meteor Shower. About 5 meteors per hour is not a large quantity, but some of these 'shooting stars' are very brilliant. Keep your eyes peeled a telescope or binoculars will of these moving objects.

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The two brightest planets in the night sky make a spectacular pairing near months' end.
As November begins, find Venus brilliantly shining in the southwestern sky as evening twilight darkens. During the month, Venus, shining at a magnitude of -4.0, will climb higher in the sky each night.
Jupiter starts out November about 30 degrees to the upper left of Venus. Find a thin, crescent Moon just below Jupiter on the evening of Nov. 3rd.
 
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