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RE: Mount Vesuvius
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The eruption of Mount Vesuvius occurred on August 24, 79AD, just one day after Vulcanalia, the festival of the Roman god of fire

Mount Vesuvius - Italy

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Pompeii Destroyed by Mount Vesuvius

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1906 Vesuvian eruption
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 L'eruzione del Vesuvio nel 1906

The eruption of 1906 killed over 100 people and ejected the most lava ever recorded from a Vesuvian eruption.
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Mount Vesuvius
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In the Shadow of Vesuvius (1987)

Since the days of the Roman Empire, Italy's Mount Vesuvius has erupted more than 50 times, devastating whole cities and towns. In A.D. 79 it destroyed Pompeii and Herculaneum, burying people alive as they ran to escape the volcano's fury. Lost and forgotten for more than 1,600 years, the once-thriving trade center of Pompeii has been successfully uncovered by archaeologists. At Herculaneum, human skeletons were found in a fatal embrace. Although Vesuvius is sleeping now, this active volcano is never far from the minds of the two million people who live in its shadow.



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Mount Vesuvius erupted on the 24th August, 79 AD.

(Some scholars believe that the event occurred on October 24)

 

The Vesuvius volcano from helicopter view



A Day in Pompeii - 5pm 24 August 79 AD



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In the year of AD 79, Mount Vesuvius erupted in one of the most catastrophic and famous eruptions of all time.
Small earthquakes started taking place on 20 August, 79 becoming more frequent over the next four days, but the warnings were not recognised.

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Somma-Vesuvius
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Main Plinian and Sub-Plinian eruptions of Somma-Vesuvius

Name of the EruptionAge (years before present or AD)
Codola25000
Basal Pumices ( Sarno) 17000
Greenish Pumices 15500
Mercato (Ottaviano) 7900
Novelle no date available
Avellino 3750
Pompei1900 (79 AD)
Pollena472 (AD)
16311631 (AD)

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Google earth file: Vesuvius.kmz (3kb, kmz)

MountVesuviusdangerzone.jpg



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RE: Mount Vesuvius
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Title: Two-way coupling between Vesuvius eruptions and southern Apennine earthquakes, Italy, by elastic stress transfer
Authors: Concetta Nostro, Ross S. Stein, Massimo Cocco, Maria Elina Belardinelli, and Warner Marzocchi

During the past 1000 years, eruptions of Vesuvius have often been accompanied by large earthquakes in the Apennines 50-60 km to the northeast. Statistical investigations had shown that earthquakes often preceded eruptions, typically by less than a decade, but did not provide a physical explanation for the correlation. Here, we explore elastic stress interaction between earthquakes and eruptions under the hypothesis that small stress changes can promote events when the Apennine normal faults and the Vesuvius magma body are close to failure. We show that earthquakes can promote eruptions by compressing the magma body at depth and opening suitably oriented near-surface conduits. Voiding the magma body in turns brings these same normal faults closer to Coulomb failure, promoting earthquakes. Such a coupling is strongest if the magma reservoir is a dike oriented normal to the regional extension axis, parallel to the Apennines, and the near-surface conduits and fissures are oriented normal to the Apennines. This preferred orientation suggests that the eruptions issuing from such fissures should be most closely linked in time to Apennine earthquakes. Large Apennine earthquakes since 1400 are calculated to have transferred more stress to Vesuvius than all but the largest eruptions have transferred to Apennine faults, which may explain why earthquakes more commonly lead than follow eruptions. A two-way coupling may thus link earthquakes and Vesuvius eruptions along a 100-km-long set of faults. We test the statistical significance of the earthquake-eruption correlation in the two-way coupling zone, and find a correlation significant at the 95% confidence level.

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Avellino event
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Title: The Avellino 3780-yr-B.P. catastrophe as a worst-case scenario for a future eruption at Vesuvius
Authors: Giuseppe Mastrolorenzo, Pierpaolo Petrone, Lucia Pappalardo, and Michael F. Sheridan

A volcanic catastrophe even more devastating than the famous anno Domini 79 Pompeii eruption occurred during the Old Bronze Age at Vesuvius. The 3780-yr-B.P. Avellino plinian eruption produced an early violent pumice fallout and a late pyroclastic surge sequence that covered the volcano surroundings as far as 25 km away, burying land and villages. Here we present the reconstruction of this prehistoric catastrophe and its impact on the Bronze Age culture in Campania, drawn from an interdisciplinary volcanological and archaeoanthropological study. Evidence shows that a sudden, en masse evacuation of thousands of people occurred at the beginning of the eruption, before the last destructive plinian column collapse. Most of the fugitives likely survived, but the desertification of the total habitat due to the huge eruption size caused a social-demographic collapse and the abandonment of the entire area for centuries. Because an event of this scale is capable of devastating a broad territory that includes the present metropolitan district of Naples, it should be considered as a reference for the worst eruptive scenario at Vesuvius.

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RE: Mount Vesuvius
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Vesuvius, the world's most dangerous volcano, is overdue for an eruption.
That's the focus of attention in a fascinating documentary, Vesuvius: Countdown to Eruption, which has been lined up for showing at 10pm on Monday on DStv's National Geographic Wild.
Mount Vesusvius, on the coast of the Bay of Naples, about 9km east of Naples and a short distance from the shore, is best known for its eruption in AD79.

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Nearly 2,000 years after wiping out Pompeii, Mount Vesuvius is among the most closely monitored volcanoes in the world, its every shudder recorded.

"Vesuvius is one of the world's most dangerous volcanos: it is always active, and 600,000 people would be directly at risk if it erupts" - vulcanologist Claudio Scarpati.

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