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Messier 86
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Messier 86 (also M86, NGC 4406, MCG 2-32-46 and PGC 40653) is a magnitude +9.8 elliptical or lenticular galaxy located 52 3 million light-years away in the constellation Virgo.

The galaxy was discovered by French astronomer Charles Messier using a 10 cm (4 inch) refracting telescope on the 18th March 1781.
The galaxy was independently discovered by William Herschel on the 8th April 1784.

Right Ascension 12h 26m 11.7s, Declination +12 56 46"

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Title: Ripping Apart at the Seams: The Network of Stripped Gas Surrounding M86
Authors: S. Ehlert, N. Werner, A. Simionescu, S.W. Allen, J.D.P. Kenney, E. Million, A. Finoguenov

We present a new study of the Virgo Cluster galaxies M86, M84, NGC 4338, and NGC 4438 using a mosaic of five separate pointings with XMM-Newton. Our observations allow for robust measurements of the temperature and metallicity structure of each galaxy along with the entire ~ 1 degree region between these galaxies. When combined with multiwavelength observations, the data suggest that all four of these galaxies are undergoing ram pressure stripping by the Intracluster Medium (ICM). The manner in which the stripped gas trailing the galaxies interacts with the ICM, however, is observably distinct. Consistent with previous observations, M86 is observed to have a long tail of ~ 1 keV gas trailing to the north-west for distances of ~ 100-150 kpc. However, a new site of ~ 0.6 keV thermal emission is observed to span to the east of M86 in the direction of the disturbed spiral galaxy NGC 4438. This region is spatially coincident with filaments of H-alpha emission, likely originating in a recent collision between the two galaxies. We also resolve the thermodynamic structure of stripped ~ 0.6 keV gas to the south of M84, suggesting that this galaxy is undergoing both AGN feedback and ram pressure stripping simultaneously. These four sites of stripped X-ray gas demonstrate that the nature of ram pressure stripping can vary significantly from site to site.

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Title: SUBARU Spectroscopy of the Globular Clusters in the Virgo Giant Elliptical Galaxy M86
Authors: Hong Soo Park (1), Myung Gyoon Lee (1), Ho Seong Hwang (2) ((1) Seoul National Univ., (2) Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory)

We present the first spectroscopic study of the globular clusters (GCs) in the giant elliptical galaxy (gE) M86 in the Virgo cluster. Using spectra obtained in the Multi-Object Spectroscopy (MOS) mode of the Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph (FOCAS) on the Subaru telescope, we measure the radial velocities for 25 GCs in M86. The mean velocity of the GCs is derived to be vp = -354+81 -79 km/s, which is different from the velocity of the M86 nucleus (vgal = -23441 km/s). We estimate the velocity dispersion of the GCs, {\sigma}p = 292+32-32 km/s, and find a hint of rotation of the M86 GC system. A comparison of the observed velocity dispersion profiles of the GCs and stars with a prediction based on the stellar mass profile strongly suggests the existence of an extended dark matter halo in M86. We also estimate the metallicities and ages for 16 and 8 GCs, respectively. The metallicities of M86 GCs are in the range -2.0 < [Fe/H] < -0.2 with a mean value of -1.130.47. These GCs show a wide age distribution from 4 to 15 Gyr.

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A new wider view of two very well-known galaxies has revealed a big surprise: They are connected by faint, starless filaments of hydrogen gas which trace back to a very high-speed intergalactic collision.
The smash-up between galaxies M86 and NGC4438 not been suspected before, and may explain why M86, which is visible to the naked eye, is unable to give birth to new stars.

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Title: Chandra's View of the Ram Pressure Stripped Galaxy M86
Authors: S. Randall, P. Nulsen, W. R. Forman, C. Jones, M. Machacek, S. S. Murray, B. Maughan

We present results from a mosaic of nine Chandra observations of M86 (NGC 4406) and the surrounding field. We detect three main diffuse components: the Virgo ICM at ~2.4 keV, the extended halo of M86 at ~1.2 keV, and the cooler central and stripped gas of M86 at ~0.8 keV. The most striking feature is a long tail of emission, which consists of a plume ~ 4' north of M86 and two main extensions emanating from the plume. Based on the morphology and temperature structure of the tail, we conclude that it is formed by ram pressure stripping of M86 as it falls into the Virgo cluster and interacts with the Virgo ICM, in agreement with earlier work. The tail is 150 kpc in projection, and a simple estimate gives a lower limit on the true length of the tail of 380 kpc, making this the longest ram pressure stripped tail presently known. The total gas mass in the plume (7x10^8 M_sun) and tail (1x10^9 M_sun) is about three times that in the core of M86, which supports the scenario where most of the gas was stripped rapidly and recently. The projected position of the plume can be understood if M86 has an aspherical potential, as suggested by optical isophotes. Ram pressure stripping from an aspherical potential can also explain the split "double tails" seen in M86 and in other Virgo cluster galaxies in the field. The large line-of-sight velocity of M86 (1550 km/s with respect to M87), its position relative to the Virgo cluster, and the orientation of the tail tightly constrain its orbital parameters. The data are inconsistent with a radial orbit, and imply inner and outer turning radii of r_i ~ 300 kpc and r_o > 8.8 Mpc, indicating that M86 is, at best, only weakly bound to the Virgo cluster.

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