* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: January 2008


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: January 2008
Permalink  
 


There are many meteor showers this month...
The Quadrantids Meteors Shower Peaks on January 3. It is active from January 1 through January 5.

You can listen to them by tuning to the 67 MHz meteor radar in Roswell, NM.

Shower Activity Period Maximum Radiant Velocity ZHR
Date R.A. Dec. km/s
Zeta Aurigids Dec 11-Jan 21 Dec. 31/Jan. 1
Quadrantids Jan 1-5 Jan. 4 16.3h 56.6 52.1 114.2
Gamma Velids Jan 1-17 Jan. 5-8
Rho Geminids Dec 28-Jan 28 Jan. 8/9
January Draconids Jan10-24 Jan. 13-16
January Bootids Jan 8-18 Jan 8 13.9h -12.0 19.4
Eta Craterids Jan 11-22 Jan. 16/17
Delta-Cancrids Dec 14-Feb 14 Jan. 17 128 +20 20.4 4
Coma Berenicid Dec8 - Jan 23 Jan 18 165 +30 6
Alpha Hydrids Jan 15-30 Jan. 20/21
Eta Carinids Jan 14-27 Jan. 21/22
Canids Jan13-30 Jan. 24/25
Alpha Leonids Jan13-Feb 13 Jan. 24-31
Aurigids Jan-Feb 23 Jan. 31 bolids
Orionids Jan. 31 15.4h -15.3 29.9 24.3
Yes, click this! for UK (A.Smith)

Radio Meteor Observation Station Track



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

January Highlights

The Beehive Cluster
Otherwise known as M44. This is an open cluster and is a wonderful object for binoculars or a small telescope. It contains nearly 200 stars. At a magnitude of 3.7, the cluster should be visible to the naked eye as a fuzzy patch of light, and as such was known to the ancients and actually included in some of their myths. Hipparchus in 130 BC called it "the little cloud". Its true nature was never revealed until 1610 when Galileo became the first person to ever see it through a telescope.
Using your binoculars, you should find about 80 (many more, if you're using a telescope). Since the Beehive is about 450 light years away the light you are seeing tonight left before Galileo first lifted his telescope toward the sky.

The Orion Nebula
Orion is a favourite target of telescope owners. In the centre of Orion's sword, just below the `belt`, lies the great Orion Nebula. Even small 60mm telescopes will show the brightest regions of the nebula and the "Trapezium"; a grouping of the brightest blue stars near the centre. The nebula glows because of the intense energy being radiated by them. The red light shows the location of the hydrogen gas, the blue light is light being reflected from the Trapezium. The blue colour has the same origin as the blue light of our daytime sky, the dust particles in this nebula, reflect blue light more readily than red.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

The Quadrantid meteor shower may not be as well known as the Perseids or Geminids. But it's just as good, producing dozens of meteors an hour. Look for them in the northeast on next Friday evening or, better, three or four hours before sunrise Jan. 5.
Like all meteor showers, the Quadrantids were named for the constellation out of which they appear to radiate. Today, the ancient constellation of Quadrans Muralis is part of the constellation Bootes.
Because it doesn't require specialized knowledge or fancy equipment, observing meteor showers can be a great social activity. Dress warmly, spread out a blanket or relax in a reclining lawn chair and look up. Bring a thermos of hot chocolate and some snacks and make it a party.

Read more


__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

MESSENGER's First Flyby of Mercury
January 14, 2008 7:00-8:00 p.m.

Read more

-- Edited by Blobrana at 19:22, 2007-12-27

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

The new year starts out with the appearance of a comet.
Comet 8P/Tuttle, a periodic comet that reappears in the inner solar system every 13.6 years, will brighten to 6th magnitude, which will make it an easy object to find with a pair of binoculars. The last week of December, the comet will be in the constellations which are directly overhead. Find the comet high in the southern sky the first week of January. Start looking for the comet as soon as it is completely dark.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

The January Night Sky
January is a fair month for viewing the planets. Mars, Saturn and Venus are visible all month. Jupiter will be visible in the morning sky for all but the start of the month. Mercury may just be visible in the evening twilight around the middle of the month.
The Earth is at perihelion (closest to the Sun) at 13:00 on January 3.
(0.983 AU From Sun)

Read more

__________________
«First  <  1 2 3 4 | Page of 4  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard