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Big cat fossil found in North Sea
The partial leg bone of a sabre-toothed cat has been dredged from the seabed by a trawler in the North Sea.
The fossil, which is between one and two million years old and found near the UK coast, is from a type of sabre-tooth called a scimitar cat.
According to palaeontologist Dick Mol, it belonged to a cat that was as heavy as a small horse.

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Woolly rhino's ancient migration
The 460,000-year-old skull of a woolly rhino, reconstructed from 53 fragments, is the oldest example of these mighty, ice age beasts ever found in Europe.
The extinct mammals reached a length of three-and-a-half metres in adulthood and, unlike their modern relatives, were covered in shaggy hair.
Details of the work appear in the journal Quaternary Science Reviews.

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The newly described skull of the oldest woolly rhinoceros in Europe shows that these giant creatures with two impressively large horns on the bridge of their noses once roamed across central Germany. The large shaggy mammals grazed at the foot of the Kyffhäuser range, whose unforested, rocky slopes loomed out of the broad, bleak plains of northern Thuringia 460,000 years ago. The climate at this time was icy cold and far drier than today.
At the time, the brow of a glacier existed only a few kilometres away, which expanded during the Elsterian ice age from Scandinavia towards the southwest and spread across the monotonous grassland. But well adapted creatures such as mammoths, reindeer, musk ox and other cold climate animals were able to survive in what was known as the mammoth steppe and found suitable food sources here. The uniform type of vegetation that emerged under these particular climatic conditions once stretched from the coasts of the Arctic Ocean to the Pacific and extended as far as central Europe in the west.

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Ice-Age rhinoceros remains found
The remains of an Ice Age rhinoceros have been unearthed by a five-year-old girl at a Gloucestershire water park.
Emelia Fawbert found the fossilised carcass at the Cotswold Water Park near Cirencester during a fossil hunt.

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Archaeologists in the Sverdlovsk Region in Russia's Urals have discovered the 9,000-year-old bones of a rhinoceros, a local museum worker said on Monday.
The excavations during which the bones were discovered were carried out at a site on the bank of the Lobva River, said Nikolai Yerokhin from the Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology, of the Ural Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences.
It was generally assumed that rhinoceros last wandered the Urals some 15,000 to 20,000 years ago. However, the latest findings seem to prove that they existed in the area a lot more recently.

Source Novosti

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10,000 BC
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In the film "10,000 BC," which opens March 7, a band of hunters venture on an epic quest, overcoming prehistoric monsters to end up at a land of gods and pyramids.
The fantastic creatures depicted in the movie from the giant carnivorous birds to sabre-toothed cats and woolly mammoths actually once existed. Whether they could have existed at 10,000 BC as shown is another story, although the ancient Egyptians might well have known of woolly mammoths.
Here's a look at the movie's beasts from a scientific perspective.

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Cave bears
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Cave bears from the Carpathians as omnivorous as modern bears
Rather than being gentle giants, new research reveals that Pleistocene cave bears, a species which became extinct 20,000 years ago, ate both plants and animals and competed for food with the other contemporary large carnivores of the time such as hyaenas, lions, wolves, and our own human ancestors. The research is published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) USA.

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Prehistoric Animals
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A prehistoric giraffe discovered in eastern Macedonia earlier this summer is the first to be found in Europe, according to palaeontologists. The ancient animal was among several sets of fossil remains dating five to ten million years ago.
Located outside the village of Stamer, near Delcovo, the fossils bear witness that antelopes, prehistoric rhinoceroses, sabre-toothed tigers, and mastodons once lived on Europe's soil, as well as the giraffe. Such evidence could also be helpful in tracing the evolution of Homo Sapien, which is believed to have originated in Africa around 200,000 years ago and migrated later to Europe and Asia.

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