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Post Info TOPIC: July 2007


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Summer Triangle
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Well up in the eastern sky during the late-evening hours is the "Summer Triangle," not a constellation, but a very noteworthy star pattern of the summer sky consisting of three bright stars from three constellations.
Brightest of the three is Vega, in the constellation of Lyra, the Lyre. Next in brightness is Altair in Aquila, the Eagle. Finally, there is Deneb in Cygnus, the Swan.
To our eyes, Altair appears to shine only half as bright as Vega and Deneb seems only one-third as bright as Vega. So at first glance, Vega appears to rule this section of the sky. In reality, however, a bit of celestial deception is at work here, for Vega is appears very bright chiefly because of its proximity to us. Vega is 25 light-years away, so when you are looking at it tonight, you are really seeing it as it was back in 1982.

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13th International Symposium on Particles, Strings and Cosmology
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Some of the world's leading physicists are gathering at Imperial College London this week for the 13th International Symposium on Particles, Strings and Cosmology. Over 200 delegates from around the world will attend more than 100 talks by renowned scientists including Professor Stephen Hawking and Nobel prize-winner, Professor Gerard 't Hooft.
The conference is bringing together experts from three distinct areas of physics: particle physicists who study the elementary particles that make up matter and radiation, string theorists whose model of physics is built on one-dimensional extended objects called strings, and cosmologists who use observations and mathematical tools to analyse the universe as a whole. The aim of the event is to encourage beneficial collaborative working across these distinct disciplines and to promote the exchange of ideas.

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Earth at Aphelion
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Contrary to what one might expect from today's sizzling heat, Earth is swinging farthest from the sun in its orbit.

"There is a simple explanation" - Patrick Wiggins, NASA solar system ambassador to Utah.

First, the difference between the farthest point and the closest point in the orbit is not great, considering that Earth's average distance from the solar furnace is 93 million miles.
The reason for the high temperature has nothing to do with the distance from the big heater. It is because of Earth's tilt.


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Earth does not orbit the Sun  in a perfect circle. The orbit is slightly elliptical (eccentric), and the distance between  the Earth and the sun changes a little bit from day to day.  On 2007,  July 7th,  the Earth reaches its most distant point from the Sun for the year -- a point astronomers call "aphelion". At this date the  Earth will be  152,097,053 kilometres  (8.44 Light Minutes) from the Sun, which is about 5 million km further away than its closest point (perihelion).
Its minimum distance from the Sun of 147,103, 622 km is  in early January.
The difference between the mean Sun-Earth distance at aphelion and perihelion is  less than 2%.
Since Earth is at its furthest from the Sun, average global sunlight arriving in July is about 7% less intense than it is in January. However, the average temperature of Earth at aphelion is about 2.3C higher than it is at perihelion - Earth is actually warmer when it is further from the Sun.
This is because  the Earth has more landmass in the northern hemisphere and more water in the south. During July in the northern summer - the mainly continental northern half of our planet is tilted toward the Sun, and the land masses heat up more easily than the oceans.
The Earth is now also orbiting at its slowest velocity around the Sun.
The date  of aphelion changes from year to year as the  direction of the  earths elliptical orbit  creeps  around  the Sun. Roughly, the date of aphelion  advances by roughly one week  for every 400 years.

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RE: July 2007
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Seventh International Conference on Mars.

Event Details:
From:    09 Jul 2007    
To:    13 Jul 2007


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Three meteor showers from different constellations will be visible in the horizon during the month of July, according to the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration.

"The meteor showers, which may even consist of fireballs or glowing shooting stars, may grace the sky as they pass by this month" - Jose Mendoza, weather specialist from the Atmospheric, Geophysical and Space Sciences Branch (AGSSB).

The Pegasids will be seen starting July 7 and will last until the 13th. Its estimated peak date is July 9, where a maximum of three meteors can be seen shooting up per hour.
The Southern Delta Aquarids is best observed from July 28 to 31, peaking before midnight and onward on July 28.
The Alpha Capricornids meteor shower will be active from July 3 to August 15 with estimated peak date on July 30.

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Seventh International Conference on Mars

Event Details:
From:09 Jul 2007
To:13 Jul 2007
Address: California Institute of Technology
Pasadena
California
Country:United States
More info:Link to event website

This five-day conference focusses on consolidating the primary paradigms that follow from the results of the last 10 years of Mars exploration and it will provide an opportunity to review and debate the key questions and controversies that remain open.

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The constellation Virgo spreads across the southwest this evening. Look for its brightest star, blue-white Spica. It remains in view until the wee hours of the morning.
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A new moon will be near Venus and Saturn from the  15 to 17 July, creating a great photo opportunity.
By this date Venus and Saturn are now dropping below the western horizon by about 10 p.m.

Sat moon-2007-7-16-22h36m
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2007-7-16-22:36

Moon Venus-2007-7-17-22h20m
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2007-7-17-22:20

On the 15th the Moon is beside the beehive star cluster (M44)

moon-2007-7-15-21h23m
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2007-7-15-21:23

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Jupiter (magnitude 2.5, in southern Ophiuchus) shines brightly in the southeast  sky after twilight.
The planet is the brightest "star" in that part of the sky, and is visible throughout most of the night.
With  binoculars you will be able to see the four main moons of Jupiter  lined up with the planet. A small telescope will provides an  better view of the planets clouds.

In Pictures: Old views of Jupiter (2 May 2007)

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