* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: Gems & Jewellery


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Perfect blue diamond
Permalink  
 


The 7.03 carat diamond, from the Cullinan mine in South Africa, is no wider than a penny piece, but it is one of only a handful in the world and is expected to reach somewhere between $5.8 million and $8.5 million (£3.9 million and £5.7 million) when it is sold in Geneva.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Kazanjian Red Diamond
Permalink  
 


One of just three in the world, the Kazanjian Red Diamond is currently being held at the Hixon Gem Vault in Los Angeles.

See more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
The Hope Diamond
Permalink  
 


Democratic America has no crown jewels. but we've got the next best thing, or maybe a better thing altogether, in the Smithsonian's National Gem Collection, on display in the National Museum of Natural History in a new setting that suits its splendour, the Janet Annenberg Hooker Hall of Geology, Gems and Minerals.
The gem collection dates back to 1884, when a curator in the Smithsonian's Division of Mineralogy assembled a modest array of American precious stones for display that year at the New Orleans Exhibition. In the ensuing 116 years, the collection has grown to a dazzling scale and beauty, thanks almost entirely to donors who wanted their jewels to be in the nation's museum.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Gems & Jewellery
Permalink  
 




-- Edited by Blobrana at 04:14, 2009-01-02

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
The Aurora collection
Permalink  
 


In the bright light, the diamonds, fixed like pin heads to trace a pyramid shape, give out fireworks of colour. Splashes of daffodil yellow, orange, olive green, lavender blue and purple dazzle the eyes.
But when the light goes down, the gemstones seem even more miraculous and mysterious. This time, exposed to ultraviolet light, there is an inner glow that makes the colours dance like fireflies in the glass case at London's Natural History Museum.
The Aurora collection of 296 coloured diamonds, with a 267.45 carat weight, has been collected and selected over 25 years by Alan Bronstein, an American dealer and gemologist. It was formerly displayed as the Aurora Pyramid of Hope at the American Museum of Natural History in New York from 1989 to 2005.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Gems & Jewellery
Permalink  
 


Diamond exploration in glaciated terrain differs from precious or base metal exploration in that it uses indicator minerals and boulders, instead of till geochemistry, to detect glacial dispersal from a kimberlite. Kimberlites are small (few hundred meters across), circular point sources. They are relatively soft rocks that have been preferentially eroded by preglacial weathering and glacial scouring to deeper levels than the surrounding bedrock surface and as a consequence are covered by lakes or thick glacial sediments. Discoveries of kimberlite on the Canadian Prairies, in the Northwest Territories and northern Ontario and Quebec have sparked unprecedented levels of diamond exploration in the glaciated Shield terrain of Canada and Finland.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Diamant Bleu
Permalink  
 


The discovery of a lump of lead in Paris has enabled experts to prove that the Hope Diamond, a star exhibit of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, is the long-lost centrepiece of the crown jewels of prerevolutionary France.
It had long been suspected that the Hope, which was given to the Smithsonian in 1958 by the jeweller Harry Winston, came from the Diamant Bleu that was looted in Paris in 1792, when King Louis XVI and Queen Marie Antoinette were being held prisoner. Now François Farge, the chief mineralogist with the Paris Museum of Natural History, has used technology to prove that it is, indeed, the crudely cut-down heart of the 69-carat diamond originally bought by an adventurer in Hyderabad, India, in the 17th century.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Gems & Jewellery
Permalink  
 


Worlds Scarcest Stones Yet to be Discovered by the Public
While it may seem Greek to some, the grandidierite, majorite or painite are just a few of the worlds rarest gemstones. And while some may be considered costly, others are surprisingly affordable thanks to their general anonymity to the public. However, each of these rare gemstones represents an exclusivity that can only be attributed to a handful of gems.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Some volcanoes bring diamonds - but not the ones in Arizona
Not all volcanoes had carbon in their lava. No carbon, no diamonds

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Gem expects to find more large diamonds at Letseng
Gem Diamonds believes there are more large stones where its latest 478 carat discovery came from. A size frequency distribution model indicates that large, high quality stones will be found on a regular basis.
Gem Diamonds' discovery of a 478 carat, white diamond at its Letseng mine in Lesotho does not come as a great surprise to the company that employs a size frequency distribution model indicating the mine will deliver gems of great size on a regular basis.

Read more

__________________
«First  <  14 5 6 7 8 9  >  Last»  | Page of 9  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard