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L

Posts: 131433
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Romano-British Slave trade
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In the year of the bicentenary of the Parliamentary Act to abolish the Atlantic slave trade a rare Roman figurine that references an earlier trade in slaves has been discovered near Andover in Hampshire.
The small bronze decoration came to light during a metal detecting rally attended by the Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS) in Hampshire in June 2007. The PAS helps metal detectorists and other members of the public to identify and log archaeological finds in England and Wales.
Cast in bronze the figure crouches with his elbows and knees drawn together. A rope starting around the neck also binds his wrists and ankles.

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L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Ancient coins
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Ancient coins have been found on a beach in the Western Isles giving new clues to the far reaching influence of the Roman Empire.
Archaeologists believe the pieces of copper alloy date from the middle of the 4th Century.
They were found in a sand dune, but the location in the Uists has been kept secret to protect the site.
Archaeologists said it was a "lucky find" as the coins were at risk of vanishing in a high tide.

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L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Romans
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The exhibit at the end of the tour of the new museum at Masada consists of 11 tiny shards bearing intriguing names.
Hundreds of inscriptions on shards were found at Masada, including some on earthenware jugs. Some are only a single letters, others contain names and numbers from the days of the rebellion and the Roman siege. The archaeologists, in particular Yigael Yadin, were reasonably good at decipher the inscriptions on the various shards, but the inscription on these 11 shards was unusual.
They were all found in the same place, next to the network of internal gates that controlled the passage to the foodstores, and were not scattered over a wide area like the other shards. They were all written in the same handwriting, and each shard contained only one name.

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L

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Life was always hard for the lead miners who toiled on the uplands of Mendip, but probably never more so than when the Romans were their masters. We do not know the system by which the Romans worked the chief mining area at Charterhouse, but we can be certain that there were no union agreements on pay and hours of work!
In the Roman invasion of AD 32 the advance across the Western counties was made by the Second Augustan Legion under the command of that brilliant, ruthless leader Vespasian, who himself later became Emperor. He is said to have fought 30 battles in the campaign and captured 20 native fortresses, including the mighty one at Maiden Castle near Dorchester.

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