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L

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Caesar invades Britain
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(old news)
Julius Caesar landed an invasion fleet on the shores of Britain in 55 B.C., expanding the boundaries of the so-called Known World and inadvertently sparking a dispute between historians and scientists for centuries to come.
Now, a team of astronomers from Texas State University-San Marcos has applied their unique brand of forensic astronomy to the enduring controversy surrounding the precise location of Caesars landfall, concluding that the historically accepted date for the event--Aug. 26-27, 55 B.C.--is incorrect. The Texas State teams proposed new date of Aug. 22-23, 55 B.C., reconciles all the conflicting evidence and offers both sides of the debate some measure of vindication in the process.

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L

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RE: Romans
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For 1800 years and more it had lain hidden but for a few vital clues: a plough that jarred on stone when it should have cut earth; a few barely visible shadows in the summer grass; the triple-peaked hill that had given it its name. Trimontium.

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Eildon
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Latitude 5534'53.11"N, Longitude 242'57.50"W

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L

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Doune Primary School pupils have been discovering the hidden treasures of ancient Rome right in the middle of their playground.
A new classroom is currently being built at Doune and because the site is home to a former Roman fort, professional archaeologists have been called in just in case there are any historical artefacts uncovered.

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L

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A previously unknown Roman fort has been found at Calstock in Cornwall, one of only a handful of sites giving evidence of Roman presence in the county, and the first found close to a silver mine.
Archaeologists from the University of Exeter say the site may be evidence the Romans mined tin in the county.

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L

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Professor Ian Freestone of the School of History and Archaeology has re-examined the famous Roman colour-changing Lycurgus Cup.
The glass cup, which dates from the fourth century A.D., changes from green in reflected light to red when light is shone through it. Some years ago Professor Freestone conducted an investigation of the colour of the cup, using transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that the colour effects were due to minute nanoparticles of a gold-silver alloy in the glass.
The cups second unusual feature is its openwork decoration. The myth of King Lycurgus of Thrace is shown in openwork - a frieze attached to the main body of the glass by small shanks or bridges.

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L

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It had lain undiscovered and untouched for almost 2,000 years and could have been lost forever if not for the persistence of an amateur archaeologist and his camera phone.
Joiner Larney Cavanagh instinctively knew he had found something special when he and his 10-year-old son happened upon a Latin-inscribed artefact in a field near their East Lothian home.
What they did not realise was that they had discovered the first Roman tombstone in Scotland for 173 years.

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Carberry
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L

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The first Roman tombstone found in Scotland for 170 years has been unearthed at Carberry, near Inveresk.
The red sandstone artefact was for a man called Crescens, a bodyguard for the governor who ran the province of Britain for the Roman Emperor.
The National Museum of Scotland said the stone provided the strongest evidence yet that Inveresk was a pivotal Roman site in northern Britain.
It was found by amateur enthusiast Larney Cavanagh at the edge of a field.
It had been ploughed up and cleared from the field without anyone noticing its inscription.

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L

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Archaeologists have discovered a footprint made by the sandal of a Roman soldier - one of the few such finds in the world - in a wall surrounding the Hellenistic-Roman city of Sussita, east of Lake Kinneret.
The discovery of the print made by a hobnailed sandal, the kind used by the Roman legions during the time when Rome ruled the region, led to the presumption that legionnaires or former legionnaires participated in the construction of walls such as the one in which the footprint was found.

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L

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English Heritage gave Roman soldiers their marching orders forcing a living history group to scrap an event at Maumbury Rings at the last minute.
Stacie Lavis, of the Invaders and Settlers Empire, said the two-day Gladiator Games needed permission from English Heritage to use the ancient monument.
But in spite of getting the go-ahead from the Duchy of Cornwall, which owns the land, and from Dorchester Town Council - which manages the site - English Heritage gave the games the thumbs-down.

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L

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Centurions of the Ninth Legion spotted three Brigantes stealing lead from a roof in Eboracum, but the thieves escaped before the might of the Roman army could catch them and throw them to the lions.
An entire legion pursued the Brigantes, who are nowadays known as Yorkshiremen, through the streets of the city now called York, but failed to catch them.
North Yorkshire Police yesterday confessed they had made no arrests, but then Imperial Rome always did have a low opinion of the native British.

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