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RE: Romans
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More than 10,000 graves containing ancient amphorae, "baby bottles," and the bodies of soldiers who fought the Carthaginians were found near the ancient Greek colony of Himera, in Italy, archaeologists announced recently.

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Archaeologists say they have uncovered a third-century battlefield in northern Germany which could prove that Roman legions were fighting in the region much later than historians have long believed.
Rome's most famous incursion into the north of modern Germany came in A.D. 9, when Roman soldiers were defeated by Germanic tribesman at the Battle of the Teutoberg Forest.
However, the newly uncovered battlefield near Kalefeld-Oldenrode, south of Hanover, is some 200 kilometres  northwest of the Teutoberg Forest and appears to date to between A.D. 180-260.

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The dig at Richborough Roman Fort near Sandwich, Kent, suggests that Emperor Claudius' men landed at a point two miles inland from the present coastline.
It is thought the fort overlooked a lagoon which disappeared as the area gradually silted up.

"It is widely known that Richborough Roman Fort was the gateway to Roman Britain 2,000 years ago, but what is really exciting is that we have actually found the Roman foreshore while digging in a deep trench alongside the remains of a Roman wall - Tony Wilmott, a senior archaeologist with English Heritage who led the excavation

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Emperor Marcus Aurelius
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Parts of a giant, exquisitely-carved marble sculpture depicting the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius have been found at an archaeological site in Turkey.
Fragments of the statue were unearthed at the ancient city of Sagalassos.

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Archaeologists have unearthed a bronze ring in West Durrington in the UK, at the site of a new hospice.
The ring was found by volunteer metal detector enthusiast John Cole, in a field off Titnore Lane, West Durrington, Worthing.
The site is just north of Northbrook College, which was built on the remains of a Roman villa.

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Archaeologists digging in Turkey have found the colossal marble head of a Roman empress.
It was discovered in a rubble-filled building where parts of a huge statue of the emperor Hadrian were unearthed last year.
The discovery, at the ancient site of Sagalassos, is thought to show Faustina the Elder, wife of Roman emperor Antoninus Pius.

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Remnants of an old Roman road have been unearthed in Bishopstone.
The discovery was made by Hereford-based specialists Archaeological Investigations Ltd during construction work on a new house.
It is thought to be part of an old road that ran across the county with the remains consisting of a foundation layer of cobbles beneath a red gravel.

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Lupa Capitolina
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Mussolini cherished her as a symbol of the "new Rome" he was bringing into being; and 60 years on, the bronze she-wolf with the gaping eyes, heavy udders and mouth half-open in a growl still says "Rome" as eloquently as the Colosseum.
But to the chagrin of Rome romantics everywhere, scientists have now proved that the Lupa Capitolina, the life-size bronze of a wolf with two human infants suckling her, on view in the city's Capitoline Museum, dates not from the time of togas and chariot races but from the 13th century, more than 1,000 years later.

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Caesar invades Britain
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Julius Caesar's invasion of Britain in 55BC could not have occurred on the dates stated in most history books, a team of astronomers have claimed.

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Caesar's Campaigns in Gaul (58-50 BC)
Caesar's Commentaries on the Gallic War (De Bellum Gallico) provide a uniquely in-depth account of Gaul and its people. While cultural descriptions are secondary to military matters in Caesar's campaigns, the reader gains a familiarity with settings, tribes, and personalities unavailable in Strabo, Tacitus, or other ancient writers. Caesar's personal record of the Gallic War included seven books on the campaigns from 58 to 52 BC, ending with the defeat of Vercingetorix.

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