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Ancient Rome treasures discovered during subway dig on show

The long-delayed project to extend Rome's subway system has brought treasures of the past to the surface and allowed them to be showcased at one of the city's new subway stations. Rome city officials this week unveiled the Metro C archaeological exhibit, which features amphora, marble panels, coins and even peach pits dating back to the Roman era.
The permanent exhibit will be on view as passengers descend into the three-story San Giovanni subway station, which is expected to open in 2018.
 
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Roman Coins ID'd in Japanese Ruins, but Their Origin Baffles

The eyes of a visiting archaeologist lit up when he was shown the 10 tiny, rusty discs that had sat unnoticed in storage for two and a half years at a dig on a southern Japan island.
He had been to archaeological sites in Italy and Egypt, and recognized the "little round things" as old coins, including a few likely dating to the Roman Empire.

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Roman Empire
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The Roman Empire's Collapse in the 5th century

Thu, 5 Apr 01

Duration: 29 mins

The causes and events of the fall of the Roman Empire in the 5th century. With guests Richard Alaston, Charlotte Roueché and David Womersely.

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Roman Britain

Thu, 1 May 03

Duration: 29 mins

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the 400 year history of the Romans in Britain. With Catherine Edwards, Greg Woolf and Mary Beard.

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New Finds Point to Roman Fashion Craze

When the prefect Flavius Cerialis hosted a banquet at Vindolanda, a Roman fort in what is now northern England, the aroma of grilled chicken, goose and venison, seasoned with pepper from India, filled the air. Plenty of beer was also on hand for the festivities.
The only thing dampening the mood of the occupying forces was the wet weather, and the clammy fort's select guests were forced to bring their foul weather wear to the feast. On such occasions they favoured a garment known as the paenula -- a wide, draping mantle made of wool, or sometimes leather or felt -- and wrapped a type of large shawl, called a laena, around their necks.
The Romans at Vindolanda compiled lists of the textiles they used, writing in ink on thin wooden tablets, and these descriptions offer insight into their clothing habits. Now, for the first time, experts are taking a closer look at samples of the textiles described in those historical documents, mud-brown scraps of cloth that have surfaced from the swampy ground beneath the ruined fort.

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New research has cast doubt on the theory that 97 infants were killed at a Roman brothel in Buckinghamshire.
In 2008, the remains of the newborn babies were rediscovered packed in cigarette cases in a dusty museum storeroom by Dr Jill Eyers from Chiltern Archaeology.
They were excavated from the remains of a lavish Roman villa complex in Buckinghamshire almost 100 years earlier, but had remained hidden ever since.
The story caught the attention of the world's press last year as Dr Eyers suggested that the villa was operating as a brothel and its occupants committing infanticide to dispose of unwanted offspring.

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Gladiators
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Roman Gladiator's Gravestone Describes Fatal Foul

An enigmatic message on a Roman gladiator's 1,800-year-old tombstone has finally been decoded, telling a treacherous tale.

"Fate and the cunning treachery of the summa rudis killed me."

The epitaph and art on the tombstone suggest the gladiator, named Diodorus, lost the battle (and his life) due to a referee's error, according to Michael Carter, a professor at Brock University in St. Catharines, Canada. Carter studies gladiator contests and other spectacles in the eastern part of the Roman Empire.
He examined the stone, which was discovered a century ago in Turkey, trying to determine what the drawing and inscription meant.

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Archaeologists have discovered a 4th Century Roman villa near Aberystwyth.
It is the most north-westerly villa found in Wales and has forced experts to reconsider the whole nature of Roman settlement across mid and north Wales.
Findings indicate Abermagwr had all the trappings of villas found further south, including a slate roof and glazed windows.

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Roman settlement
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Artefacts discovered on the route of the new Porthmadog bypass are making archaeologists rethink the way the Romans lived in the area.
The most significant find - a large lime kiln - was previously hidden under an earth mound.
The Gwynedd Archaeological Trust says the kiln, and slates from a building for high-ranking officials, indicate a large Roman settlement.

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Skeletons unearthed in York over the past decade may be part of the world's only well-preserved Roman gladiator cemetery, researchers say.
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