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Ice Age probe is off to Italy
Archaeologists at the University of Bradford will be leading an exploration into how prehistoric people made their living in Italy at the end of the Ice Age.
The research aims to find out how hunter-gatherers in Mediterranean Europe survived before farming became widespread and why the transition to agriculture was a smooth one.

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Archaeologists have found a piece of string that is 8,000 years old.
The fibres were discovered in a flooded Stone Age settlement just off the coast of the Isle of Wight.
The four-and-a-half inch long string was made from tough stems of honeysuckle, nettles or wild clematis that were twisted together.
Marine archaeologists discovered it when they found a pre-historic camp 30 feet below the surface, 200 yards off the Isle of Wight.
The team, led by Gary Momber of the Hampshire and Wight Trust for Maritime Archaeology, cut small blocks of the sea floor out for analysis after seeing the wooded remains of the settlement by chance. The string was buried in one of them.

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Reindeer meat went from being an occasional treat to everyday fare among prehistoric cavemen who lived in Southwest France and what is now the Czech Republic, two new studies suggest. In fact, so many nibbled-on reindeer bones were present in their caves that possible calendars circa 26,000 years ago might have been carved on the leftover bones. They may have also been used as counting devices or for ornamentation.
The first study, authored by J. Tyler Faith, analysed bones found in limestone cave and rock shelters at a site called Grotte XVI at Dordogne near Bordeaux. The numbers and types of bones revealed plenty - how, for instance, the hunters butchered the meat, how far they travelled to hunt, and details about populations of the animals themselves.
Faith, a George Washington University anthropologist, determined that 64,600 years ago, the cave dwellers - including Neanderthals - only brought back the choicest reindeer cuts. The meat seemed to multiply over the years so that by 12,285 years ago, virtually all parts of the reindeer were being eaten, with the animals constituting 90 percent of large mammal game. This suggests the reindeer population in the region steadily increased over the years, so the cavemen didn't have to travel far out of their homes to get a nutritious reindeer dinner. By the looks of things in the cave, during the Magdalenian era the dwellers filled themselves on everything from reindeer ribs to roast of reindeer as a result.
Donald Grayson, a University of Washington anthropologist who has also extensively studied the French site, said that the new study is "important, insightful and innovative." The pollen record for the region, which reflects past vegetation, shows ever-decreasing summer temperatures favored more and more reindeer, which thrive under cooler conditions. According to Faith, when temperatures rose sharply after around 12,000 years ago, "reindeer became locally extinct and their southern boundary in Europe retreated northwards."
Before this happened, prehistoric hunters in what is now the Czech Republic were also up to their ears in leftover reindeer bones.
A separate study published in this month's Antiquity describes two decorative art pieces from Predmosti that were carved on bone that likely was reindeer. Rebecca Farbstein, who co-authored the paper with Jiri Svoboda, admitted that "the small size and fragmentary nature of these pieces make interpretation about their meaning speculative."
Farbstein, a researcher in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Cambridge, and her colleague determined that the bones were covered with a distinctive grid pattern on one side. Based on a review of other objects from the same time period, the carved bones could indicate that prehistoric Europeans may have marked their time on bone calendars made out of the then-common animals.

Source: Discovery News


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Before the end of the last ice age, a hunter-gatherer left a bag of tools near the wall of a roundhouse residence, where archaeologists have now found the collection 14,000 years later.
The tool set -- one of the most complete and well preserved of its kind -- provides an intriguing glimpse of the daily life of a prehistoric hunter-gatherer.
The contents, as described to Discovery News by Phillip Edwards, a senior lecturer in the Archaeology Program at Melbourne's La Trobe University, show the owner of the bag was well equipped for obtaining meat and edible plants in the wild.

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A site of prehistoric humans of the ice age has been found in the Solnechniy District near Lake Evoron
Archaeologists have found a site of ancient humans of the Stone Age. The site dates back 15 thousand years ago, the Khabarovsk Museum of Archaeology reported to RIA PrimaMedia.

"The site, which dates back to the end of the ice age, has been found in the Solnechniy District, not far away from Lake Evoron. A total of four similar sites have been found in the Territory in the area of the low Amur, but this one is the largest" - Andrei MALAYVIN, the Chair of the archaeology department at the Khabarovsk Museum of Archaeology.

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Archaeologists have recently discovered a ancient Palaeolithic site dated around 15 thousand years. The human settlement  dates back to the Ice age, which makes the find very important.
The Lower reaches of the Amur River have already revealed four ancient human settlements, but this discovery is by far the largest settlement.  The discovery of  a  stone dart and arrow tips and stone scraper show that the People who inhabiting the site  used to hunt mammoths. Similar things were found in Yakutia.

" , , " - .

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Ancient Chewing Gum Yields DNA
Steven LeBlanc has been dreaming about ancient DNA for several decades, but he never had any luck extracting it from museum artefacts. Then, a few years ago, LeBlanc, an archaeologist and collections manager at Harvard University's Peabody Museum in Cambridge, Massachusetts, had a brainstorm. He was staring at drawers full of quids--wads of plant material chewed by ancient Native Americans--when he realized, "Quid ... saliva ... DNA ... DING!"

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A 5,000-year-old piece of chewing gum has been discovered by an archaeology student from the University of Derby.
    
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Sarah Pickin, an archaeology student has discovered a 5,000-year-old  lump of birch bark tar chewing gum complete with Neolithic tooth prints - while on a dig as a volunteer in Finland.
Neolithic people used the material as an antiseptic to treat gum infections as well as a glue for repairing broken pots.

Its particularly significant because well-defined tooth imprints were found on the gum that Sarah discovered  - Trevor Brown, Ms Pickins tutor at the University of Derby.

Source The Times

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Face to face with Stone Age man: The Hadzabe tribe of Tanzania
The rocks by the fire were still warm. Old animal bones and feathers were scattered around the clearing.
The skin of a wild cat was stretched out to dry in the sun.
Startled impala and dik-dik small deer darted through the undergrowth; colourful birds whirred into the sky.

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