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Post Info TOPIC: June 2007


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Date:
Summer Solstice
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Thousands of modern-day druids, pagans and partygoers converged on Stonehenge early Thursday to cheer the dawn of the longest day of the year in the northern hemisphere - the summer solstice.
Clad in antlers, black cloaks and oak leaves, a group gathered at the Heel stone - a twisted, pockmarked pillar at the edge of the prehistoric monument - to welcome the rising sun as revellers danced and yelled.

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Date:
June Bootid meteor shower
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The second notable astronomical event is the annual June Bootid meteor shower which is expected to peak at around 10 pm, June 27. The shower comes from the debris spewed by Comet 7P.Pons-Winnecke, which orbits the Sun once every 6.37 years.
Dont expect much, said Pagasa, since the waxing full moon may blur observation.

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Title: The 2004 June Bootid meteor shower
Authors: Vaubaillon, J.; Arlt, R.1; Shanov, S.1; Dubrovski, S.1; Sato, M.2

The June Bootid meteor shower is known to show irregular activity. We report here the prediction and observations of the 2004 shower. The forecasts were independently performed by three different teams, who all concurred on a broad activity on June 23, though no estimate of the level was done prior to the event. Thanks to these predictions, observations around the world were conducted and gathered by the International Meteor Organisation. The broad activity (full width at half-maximum ~ 7 h) was observed, with a maximum occurring at 14:50 ± 60 minute. The level of the shower reached a zenithal hourly rate (ZHR) of 30 ± 10 , for a population index of r= 2.49 ± 0.15 . Past showers are examined and new associations between the 1916 and 1998 showers and several trails from the early nineteenth century are made. An attempt to post-predict the values of the level of all these showers is discussed. New observations of comet 7P/Pons-Winnecke are needed when it returns in 2008.

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June Bootid

2007 Jun 28 04:04 June Bootid meteor shower at peak (ZHR=var)

Active: June 22 July 2
Maximum: June 27; 20h00m UT ( = 95°7)
ZHR = variable - 0100+
Radiant: = 224°; = +48°
r =2.2
v = 18 km/s
95°7
  
  



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L

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Date:
RE: June 2007
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Occultation of Venus on 18 June



Disappearance
                   U.T.  Sun Moon     CA  PA  WA   a    b
Location h m s Alt Alt Az o o o m/o m/o

Santiago de Comp14 22 9 61 60 136 2S 193 178 +9.9 +9.9
Dublin Ireland 13 52 56 56 50 139 58S 136 122 +1.2 -0.9
Belfast Nor Irel13 52 18 55 49 140 62S 132 117 +1.2 -0.7
Glasgow Scotland13 53 29 53 49 143 68S 127 112 +1.2 -0.5
Valladolid Spain14 30 57 57 64 145 1S 194 179 +9.9 +9.9
Aberdeen Scotlan13 55 37 51 49 148 73S 122 107 +1.2 -0.4


Source

MONDAY, JUNE 18: Saturday's noticeable alignment is a mere prelude to
Monday night's spectacular view! look to the west to see the bright
Venus, the crescent moon, Saturn and Regulus in a straight line from
bottom to top!

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Meteor shower lights up sky
Did you think you were wishing upon a falling star Wednesday night? Sorry, it was just burning space debris.
What many people saw was the beginning of a minor meteor shower, named after the constellation Bootes, according to Ron DiIulio, director of the University of North Texas' astronomy lab program.
What's causing this meteor shower? The Earth is passing through the tail of a comet.

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Shower Activity Period Maximum Radiant Velocity ZHR
    Date R.A. Dec. km/s  
June Scutids   3rd June
     
May-Librids   4th June 16.5h -22.8° 12.2 4.2
June Lyrdis June 1-21 5th June 17.3h 40.0 ° 37.2 7
Arietids 12h (daylight) June 2 - 14 8th June 20.9h 57.8° 12.4 52.7
Pi Puppids   16th June 7.5h -15.0° 24.8 25
Northern May Ophiuchids 17th June 17th June 18.5h 4.3 ° 10  
Beta Taurids (daylight) June 6-July 18 May 13-18 79.4 ° 21.2 °    

           
Yes, click this! for UK (A.Smith)

Radio Meteor Observation Station Track




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L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Meteoroids 2007
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Meteoroids 2007, an international meeting on minor bodies organised in Barcelona.

June 11-15, 2007
Held by CosmoCaixa, the Science Museum of the "Obra Social Fundació La Caixa"

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Posts: 131433
Date:
Tenth European Meeting
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From the Planck Scale to the Electroweak Scale
Warsaw, Poland, June 9 - 13, 2007

The meeting will be the tenth one in a series of meetings on physics beyond the Standard Model, organized jointly by several European groups: Bonn, CERN, Ecole Polytechnique, CEA Saclay, ICTP, Madrid, Oxford, Padua, Pisa, SISSA and Warsaw.
The previous meetings in this series were held in Kazimierz (1998), Bad Honnef (1999), Castelvecchio Pascoli (2000), La Londe les Maures (2001), Kazimierz (2002), Madrid (2003), Bad Honnef (2004), Trieste (2005) and Paris (2006).

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L

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Date:
RE: June 2007
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Mercury: at magnitude 0.5, starts the month in the constellation Gemini. The planet is best seen from 22.3h -23.5h UT. On the 2nd June the planet is at greatest eastern elongation (23.4 degrees) at 10:00 UT, and at aphelion on the 22nd The planet is stationary on 15th June. The planet is located 6 degrees away from the Moon on the 16th..
(On June 31st, RA= 6h18m33s Dec=+25°07.8' (J2000) Distance=0.833AU Elongation= 23° Phase=38% Diameter=8.1")

Venus: is an evening morning star of magnitude -4.3, The planet is in constellation Gemini at the start of the month. On the 9th June the planet is at greatest eastern elongation.. It is best seen from 7.9h - 0.8h UT.
(On June 1st, RA= 7h54m12s Dec=+23°30.0' (J2000) Distance=0.768AU Elongation= 45° Phase=53% Diameter=21.7")

spacer.gif Moon Phase Now!

Moon Phase Now!

Earth: on June 21st, Summer (Northern Hemisphere) begins at the solstice.
The Moon is half a degree south of the star Aldebaran on the 1st June. The Moon is only 0.4 degrees from the star Regulus on the 20th.

Mars: at magnitude 0.8 starts the month in the constellation Pisces. On the 5th June the planet is at perihelion. The planet enters the constellation Aries on June 26. Mars is 5 degrees from the Moon on the 10th. June. The planet is best seen from 3.0h - 3.9h UT.
(On June 1st, RA= 0h47m46s Dec= +3°28.1' (J2000) Distance=1.623AU Elongation= 58° Phase=89% Diameter=5.8")

Jupiter: is still bright at magnitude -2.6 in the constellation Ophiuchus and close to the bright star, Antares. The planet is best seen from 21.7h - 4.7h UT.
(On June 1st, RA=16h56m35s Dec=-21°55.7' (J2000) Distance=4.309AU Elongation=176°)

The planet Jupiter is a source of huge radio storms. Click the link to hear the live audio stream.
The radio outbursts are in the frequency range 18 - 32 MHz. Sensitive receivers translate Jupiter's radio waves to audio sounds.
Click! For alternative listening site.
click here! for Great RedSpot Transit times.
Click! For Satellite predictions.

Saturn: at magnitude 0.4 sits in the constellation Leo. Saturn reached opposition on February 10th.
Worth a look with binoculars.
The planet is best seen from 21.3h - 3.5h UT. The planet is located 0.4 degrees away from the Moon on the 19th.
(On June 1st, RA= 9h29m53s Dec=+16°08.0' (J2000) Distance=9.532AU Elongation= 69°)

click here! for interactive Saturn moon calculator .

Uranus is in the constellation Aquarius, near Lambda Aquarii, magnitude 3.7. Uranus at magnitude 5.8, has a bluish-green hue and appears 3.7 arcseconds wide. The planet is stationary on June 23rd. The planet is best seen from 1.8h - 1.9h UT.
This month the planet is located 1.5 degrees away from the 4th magnitude star Phi Aquarii.
(On June 26th, RA=23h19m15s Dec= -5°14.2' (J2000) Distance=19.798AU Elongation=105°)

Neptune: in the constellation Capricornus near to the 4.3 mag star Iota Capricornii. A telescope will usually show a tiny bluish dot, only 2.5 arcseconds wide (mag 8.0). Neptune is best seen from 3.7h - 6.0h UT. The planet was Stationary: Getting Retrograde on the 25th May..
(On June 1st,
RA=21h37m29s Dec=-14°26.9' (J2000) Distance=29.713AU Elongation=108°)

Pluto is in the constellation Sagittarius (mag 13.9) is not visible in the southern sky this month. Normally, a finder chart is necessary to help in identifying the 0.1" diameter dwarf planet. On the 19th June the planet is at opposition at 7:00 UT. The dwarf planet is best seen from 23.6h - 2.6h UT.
(On May 1st, RA=17h54m16s Dec=-16°23.5' (J2000) Distance=30.593AU Elongation=132°)

The Sun enters the zodiac sign Cancer on the 21st June, 19:06 UT.



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L

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Unless your passion is for observing the Sun and sunspots, there is an argument for giving astronomy from Scotland, during June, a  rest, if only for a month or two. As the Sun ascends to its most northerly point at the summer solstice, due at 19:06 BST on 21 June, so twilight floods our sky throughout the night and swamps the fainter stars and many other interesting objects.
Happily, dark nights will be with us again in time for Perseids meteor shower in August, an event which promises to be a sparkling curtain-raiser under moonless skies for a new season of stargazing.
Our June nights may be brief and hardly worthy of the name, but at least for the next few days we have the chance of spotting all the naked eye planets between nightfall and dawn. Indeed, three of them are aligned in our western evening sky.

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L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Jupiter at Opposition
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Jupiter lights up the southern sky this week. The planet lines up opposite the Sun, so it rises around sunset and remains in view all night. Its brightest for the year, too, so you cant miss it. Look for a dazzling star low in the southeast in early evening, and scooting across the south during the night.
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Posts: 131433
Date:
Moon over La Serena
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I took this picture with my little digital camera last night through a telescope lens at Mamalluca Observatory, on a hill above Vicuna in the Elqui Valley. I'm very impressed with it, but more of that later.


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