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RE: HATNet
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The Hungarian Automated Telescope Network (HATNet) project is a network of six small fully-automated "HAT" telescopes. The scientific goal of the project is to detect and characterise extrasolar planets using the transit method. This network is used also to find and follow bright variable stars. The network is maintained by the Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics.
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L

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Gāspār Bakos started his planet search with a $350 Nikon telephoto lens from a used-camera store in Manhattan.
His current arrays - including four HAT telescopes at Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins in Arizona - are a bit pricier. Once you add the fancy digital technology and mounting hardware, each telescope costs about $50,000.
The design, developed by Bakos and three amateur astronomers in Hungary, still employs a relatively modest telephoto lens, hooked up to a CCD camera and set on a movable, robotically controlled mount.
They scan the night sky in a wide field, searching for the periodic dimming of stars, signs that a planet is passing.

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L

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HATNet is a network of six small (11cm diameter), wide-field (8x8deg), fully-automated "HAT" telescopes. The scientific goal of the project is to detect and characterize extrasolar planets (exoplanets; those outside the Solar System), and also to find and follow bright variable stars. The network is maintained by the Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics. There are two main stations: the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO) of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and the Submillimeter Array (SMA) site of SAO atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

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