* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: Tsunami Facts


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Tsunami Facts
Permalink  
 


Mangroves Won't Stop Tsunamis
Claims that coastal tree barriers can halt the might of a tsunami are false and dangerous, a team of international marine scientists said today.
There are many reasons for preserving the world's dwindling stocks of mangroves, but protecting people from tsunamis is not one of them, they say.
On the eve of the anniversary of the devastating 2004 Boxing Day Tsunami, which claimed nearly a quarter of a million lives around the eastern Indian Ocean, researchers have issued a strong warning against coastal communities and governments putting their trust in mangrove and tree barriers erected as a means of protection from earthquake-driven tidal waves.

Read more


__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Coastal towns such as Folkestone and Dover could be at risk from a tsunami, according to a Timewatch programme to be shown tonight.
The show, on BBC2 at 8pm, examined previous undersea tremors in UK history and discovered they have occurred on many occasions.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

NOAA deployed the final two tsunami detection buoys in the South Pacific this week, completing the buoy network and bolstering the U.S. tsunami warning system. This vast network of 39 stations provides coastal communities in the Pacific, Atlantic, Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico with faster and more accurate tsunami warnings.
These final two deep-ocean assessment and reporting of tsunami (DART) stations, deployed off the Solomon Islands, will give NOAA forecasters real-time data about tsunamis that could potentially impact the U.S. Pacific coast, Hawaii and U.S. Pacific territories. Tsunami sensors are now positioned between Hawaii and every seismic zone that could generate a tsunami that would impact the state and beyond, including the U.S. West Coast. Buoys already in the western Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean have been keeping watch over the U.S East and Gulf coasts.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Evidence of past events and modelling of potential future events suggest that tsunamis are significant threats to Oregon coastal communities. Although a potential tsunami-inundation zone from a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake has been delineated, what is in this area and how communities have chosen to develop within it have not been documented. A vulnerability assessment using geographic-information-system tools was conducted to describe tsunami-prone landscapes on the Oregon coast and to document city variations in developed land, human populations, economic assets, and critical facilities relative to the tsunami-inundation zone. Results indicate that the Oregon tsunami-inundation zone contains approximately 22,201 residents (four percent of the total population in the seven coastal counties), 14,857 employees (six percent of the total labour force), and 53,714 day-use visitors on average every day to coastal Oregon State Parks within the tsunami-inundation zone. The tsunami-inundation zone also contains 1,829 businesses that generate approximately $1.9 billion in annual sales volume (seven and five percent of study-area totals, respectively) and tax parcels with a combined total value of $8.2 billion (12 percent of the study-area total). Although occupancy values are not known for each facility, the tsunami-inundation zone also contains numerous dependent-population facilities (for example, adult-residential-care facilities, child-day-care facilities, and schools), public venues (for example, religious organizations and libraries), and critical facilities (for example, police stations). Racial diversity of residents in the tsunami-inundation zone is low, with 96 percent identifying themselves as White, either alone or in combination with one or more race. Twenty-two percent of the residents in the tsunami-inundation zone are over 65 years in age, 36 percent of the residents live on unincorporated county lands, and 37 percent of the households are renter occupied. The employee population in the tsunami-inundation zone is largely in accommodation and food services, retail trade, manufacturing, and arts and entertainment sectors.
Results indicate that vulnerability, described here by exposure (the amount of assets in tsunami-prone areas) and sensitivity (the relative percentage of assets in tsunami-prone areas) varies considerably among 26 incorporated cities in Oregon. City exposure and sensitivity to tsunami hazards is highest in the northern portion of the coast. The City of Seaside in Clatsop County has the highest exposure, the highest sensitivity, and the highest combined relative exposure and sensitivity to tsunamis. Results also indicate that the amount of city assets in tsunami-prone areas is weakly related to the amount of a community's land in this zone; the percentage of a city's assets, however, is strongly related to the percentage of its land that is in the tsunami-prone areas. This report will further the dialogue on societal risk to tsunami hazards in Oregon and help identify future preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery planning needs within coastal cities and economic sectors of the state of Oregon

Source USGS

Download 43-page Report (2.3mb, PDF)
Download the supporting database (184kb, xls)



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Tsunami Early Warning
Permalink  
 


DEWS
The European Commission is taking over a significant role in the early warning process in the Indian Ocean, strongly building upon the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS).

"As excellent progress has been achieved within the GITEWS project so far, it is now high time to give more countries in the Indian Ocean region like Thailand or Sri Lanka timely access to early warning information, as well as real-time earthquake and ocean data.  This enables them to save the lives of their peoples" - Dr. Joachim Wächter, Head of Computing Centre at GFZ, Potsdam, Germany.  

DEWS (Distant Early Warning System), mainly funded by the European Unions 6th Framework Programme, has been started this year in order to build up an interoperable tsunami early warning system for the entire Indian Ocean region, beginning with Indonesia, Thailand, Sri Lanka and New Zealand. Besides big industrial corporations like Atos Origin, SAAB AB or Elsag Datamat, and national research centres, national warning centres, leading universities and SMEs are participating in the project. By involving 11 partner countries, a new multi-national approach is being pushed by the EU.

The disaster of 2004 demonstrated drastically the urgent need for a new generation of reliable tsunami early warning system in the Indian Ocean Region. Since then much progress has been made to minimise the threats to human life caused by such ravaging events.
Especially for Indonesia, the GITEWS project (German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System), that started in 2005 and expires in 2008, has been very successful so far.
Within the frame of the new DEWS project, funded by the EU, a consortium of a well balanced number of public and private organisations from several EU member states and the INCO countries Indonesia, Thailand and Sri Lanka are working closely together in order to design and implement an open, standard based early warning system for the Indian Ocean.
A broad range of competence and application experience will build up a system with focus on the advance warning time and on a functioning information logistics for warnings, both at national and at international level. Additionally, competent support comes from Japan and New Zealand in the field of geoscientific experience and long-term disaster prevention.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Tsunami Facts
Permalink  
 


GFZ Potsdam, Germanys National Lab for Geosciences, has made available two PDF  articles about  advice for  travellers going to potentially threatening earthquakes and tsunamis areas: What to do if you experience a strong Earthquake and Tsunami.

Leaflets: What to do when you experience a strong earthquake Intern-pdf.gifTsunami Intern-pdf.gif



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

In the wake of yesterdays tsunami in the Solomon Islands, National Geographic News looks at how the killer waves are caused, what the warning signs are, and how to respond when a tsunami threatens.

A tsunami is a series of great sea waves caused by an underwater earthquake, landslide, or volcanic eruption. More rarely, a tsunami can be generated by a giant meteor impact with the ocean.

Scientists have found traces of an asteroid-collision event that they say would have created a giant tsunami that swept around the Earth several times, inundating everything except the tallest mountains 3.5 billion years ago. The coastline of the continents was changed drastically and almost all life on land was exterminated.

Read more

__________________
«First  <  1 2 | Page of 2  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard