* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: NGC2244


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Rosette Nebula
Permalink  
 


Stars incubating developing planets would do best to stay at least 1.6 light years away from very massive stellar neighbours. If they venture any closer than this, they risk having the raw materials needed for planet formation blown away from them, a new study says.
Previous studies have shown that radiation from very massive stars can evaporate the planet-forming discs of gas and dust around other nearby stars. But the exact size of the 'danger zone' around massive stars was not known.
Now, Zoltan Balog of the University of Arizona in Tucson, US, and colleagues have used NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope to map the extent of danger zones around massive stars in the Rosette Nebula, a star-forming region 5200 light years from Earth.

Rosette
Expand (49kb, 560 x 400)
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Z Balog/University of Arizona/University of Szeged

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

A place where stars are born in a far-away region of the Milky Way has been captured by the Isaac Newton telescope from a mountain in the Canaries.
The image, the most detailed ever taken, reveals the warm red glow of hydrogen in the Rosette Nebula, a vast cloud of cosmic detritus left over from dying stars and cataclysmic explosions drifting in space 4,500 light years from Earth. Within the 46 trillion km-wide nursery, clumps of dust coalesce over tens of millions of years and eventually collapse under their own gravity, only to emerge as fledgling suns, blinking their first rays of light into the universe.

Read more

Attachments
__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
The Rosette nebula (NGC 2237)
Permalink  
 


ASTRONOMERS MAKE SUPER-DETAILED IMAGE OF GIANT STELLAR NURSERY
An international team of astronomers have collaborated to create the most detailed image ever produced of the Rosette Nebula (NGC 2237), a giant stellar nursery. The new image was assembled using data from INT Photometric H-Alpha Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane (IPHAS) and covers four square degrees of sky, equivalent in size to about twenty times the size of the full moon. Robert Greimel from the University of Graz, Austria, will present results from the survey in a talk on Wednesday 18 April at the Royal Astronomical Society National Astronomy Meeting in Preston.

IMAGE (153mb, 7645 x 6995)

The Rosette nebula is a vast cloud of dust and gas spanning 100 light years and lying about 4500 light-years away, in the direction of the constellation of Monoceros. Inside the nebula lies a cluster of bright, massive, young stars (NGC 2244), whose strong stellar winds and radiation have cleared a hole in the nebula's centre. Ultraviolet light from these hot stars excites the surrounding nebula, causing it to glow.
Star formation is still active around the nebula, as proven by the presence of a very young infrared star (AFGL 961) still in its final stages of formation. It is thought that the young massive stars in the nebula will one day blow all the gas and dust away. The centre of the Rosette Nebula is about 1.8 degrees below the Galactic Plane, the glow from which can be seen at the top left (northeastern) corner of this image.
Due to the large size of the nebula on the sky, most large telescopes are unable to capture the entire nebula in one exposure and therefore the highest resolution images have been limited to small areas of the nebula. The IPHAS team is in the process of imaging the entire plane of our Galaxy and members of the survey team were able to combine almost 200 individual images to make this large and detailed H-alpha image.

"The superb quality of this image reflects the high quality and large amounts of data produced by the IPHAS survey. Using images like this one, many members of our collaboration are working hard to make important discoveries about the structure and content of our Galaxy" - Nick Wright from University College, London.

Even more detailed images of the central parts of the Rosette Nebula have also been prepared by the IPHAS team, including one of dense dust lanes in the nebula where star formation may still be ongoing.
IPHAS is a survey of the entire Northern Galactic Plane at three different wavelengths, using the Wide Field Camera on the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope sited on La Palma in the Canary Islands. When complete, it will cover an area of 1800 square degrees. The survey is now almost finished and the first release of the catalogue is expected by June 2007. IPHAS will soon be followed by VPHAS+, a complementary Southern Galactic Plane survey using the ESO 2.5m VLT Survey Telescope (VST) in Chile.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
NGC2244
Permalink  
 


Title: SPITZER/IRAC-MIPS Survey of NGC2244: Protostellar Disk Survival in the Vicinity of Hot Stars
Authors: Zoltan Balog, James Muzerolle, G. H. Rieke, Kate Y. L. Su, Eric T. Young

We present the results from a survey of NGC 2244 from 3.6 to 24 micron with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 24micron-8micron-3.6micron colour composite image of the region shows that the central cavity surrounding the multiple O and B stars of NGC2244 contains a large amount of cool dust visible only at 24micron. Our survey gives a detailed look at disk survivability within the hot-star-dominated environment in this cavity. Using mid infrared two colour diagrams ([3.6]-[4.5] vs [5.8]-[8.0]) we identified 337 class II and 25 class I objects out of 1084 objects detected in all four of these bands with photometric uncertainty better than 10%. Including the 24 micron data, we found 213 class II and 20 class I sources out of 279 stars detected also at this latter band. The centre of the class II density contours is in very good agreement with the centre of the cluster detected in the 2MASS images. We studied the distribution of the class II sources relative to the O stars and found that the effect of high mass stars on the circumstellar disks is significant only in their immediate vicinity.

Read more (2069kb, PDF)

__________________
«First  <  1 2 | Page of 2  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard