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TOPIC: Archaeology


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Korean Peninsula Bronze Age
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The government said Friday it has decided to revise its school textbooks to extend the Bronze Age on the Korean Peninsula by up to one millennium.
The decision comes amid China trying to play down ancient Korea as a mythical nation in an apparent bid to claim the territory of Korea's ancient kingdoms.
The Ministry of Education & Human Resources Development said that, starting the semester that begins in March, middle and high school students will study history with the new version of the textbooks.
The revised textbooks describe the Bronze Age as having begun between 2,000 B.C. and 1,500 B.C. on the peninsula, up to one millennium earlier than the years described in old ones.
The ministry's decision reflects many historians' opinion that South Korea's current history textbooks carry misinformation on the dawn of the milestone period in civilization's development on its territory.
The new textbooks also give a more specific account of the founding of ancient Korea by saying that Dangun set it up in 2333 B.C., while the old version says the nation "was said to have been founded by Dangun."

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Liman Tepe
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Liman Tepe
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Latitude: 38.363392° Longitude: 26.775890°

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The partially submerged Liman Tepe, a major Early Bronze Age harbour town located in İzmir's Urla district (Turkey), possesses the world's oldest breakwater, said archaeologist Professor Hayat Erkanal. Breakwaters, an important part of modern nautical life worldwide, are constructed on or near coastal areas as a defence from incoming waters that protects ships as well as land from harsh weather and high tides.
Erkanal has been the head of this excavation site since 1992 and presented information about the excavations at a press conference together with Urla Mayor Selçuk Karaosmanoğlu. Erkanal said their excavations continued both on land and underwater and their aim was to explore the hidden parts of the settlement buried underwater.    

"Excavations indicated that Liman Tepe had interaction with different cultures and was a corridor for numerous cultures due to its geographical situation as well as its port, an important spot for overseas trade and multilateral cultural interaction at the time. The whole harbour complex is buried underwater today and our aim is to uncover the complete port complex and settlement hidden underwater."

Liman Tepe is a major prehistoric settlement that was inhabited from the Neolithic Age until the end of the late Bronze Age, continuing into the Classical Age. Erkanal further noted that their underwater work indicates that Liman Tepe has the world's oldest breakwater, which was built to block the strong north winds and as a natural part of the city wall.

"Our excavations in the settlement focus on Early Bronze Age remains. The settlement was surrounded by a monumental city wall and consisted of two cities: downtown and an Acropolis, which included a palace-like structure representing political, economic and religious power".

According to Erkanal, the most significant finding from last year's excavations was part of an anchor, which is made of wood and metal, and indicates evidence of marine activities. He added that they had previously unearthed a sunken ship found during excavations and is now ready to go on display at the Underwater Archaeology Museum to be opened in Urla.

"We want to list all the underwater treasures of the area in an inventory and also to open the excavation site to the public."

Source: Turkish Daily News

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RE: Archaeology
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The lost treasure of Maxentius, the last preChristian Roman emperor, has been unearthed by archaeologists. Imperial standards, lances and glass spheres, right, were buried on the Palatine Hill by Maxentius before his battle with Constantine the Great in AD312.

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Date:
Caerleon Fortress
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Last term the Ancient Studies society went on a trip to Caerleon fort, president Gemma Strutt and vice president Shona Carnall tell us just what they got up to, and what the Ancient Studies society is all about.

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Date:
Archaeology
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Genialinius Gennatus was one fine duck hunter.
In the third century , he recorded his prowess in high Latin on a stone tablet that he dedicated to Jupiter. That and a hefty donation probably ensured that the tablet won display in the temple to the Roman god in the settlement then called Colonia.
Five or six centuries later, Cologne's early Christians, perhaps offended by the tablet dedicated to a pantheist god, chucked it into the silting channel between the Rhine river port and a small island on the Rhine, unknowingly ensuring the hunter's immortality.
Historians now know the ordinary man named Gennatus hunted ducks and prayed to Jupiter because of Cologne's decision to punch 2 1/2 miles of new north-south light railway tunnel through the silt and sediment that lie beneath one of Germany's oldest cities.

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