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Whales only recently evolved into giants due to changing oceans

The blue whale, which uses baleen to filter its prey from ocean water and can reach lengths of over 100 feet, is the largest vertebrate animal that has ever lived. On the list of the planet's most massive living creatures, the blue whale shares the top ranks with most other species of baleen whales alive today. According to new research from scientists at the University of Chicago, Stanford University and the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, however, it was only recently in whale's evolutionary past that they became so enormous.
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Whale's eye view: Footage reveals hidden whale world

In a new study by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and Oregon State University in March, scientists in remote Antarctica have attached cameras with speedometers and suction cups to the backs of minke and humpback whales.
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Whale Songs
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WHOI Study Reveals Previously Unknown Component of Whale Songs

Researchers have known for decades that whales create elaborate songs, sometimes projecting their calls for miles underwater. A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), however, has revealed a previously unknown element of whale songs that could aid this mode of communication, and may play a pivotal role in locating other whales in open ocean.
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US Navy limits 'whale-harming' sonar in Pacific

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Ageing whales: Scars reveal social secrets

Scientists studying one of the ocean's most mysterious whale species have found they form long-term alliances.
Baird's beaked whales, sometimes called giant bottlenose whales, seem to prefer the company of specific individuals.

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Ice Age bowhead whales' survival surprises scientists

Ancient DNA shows that bowhead whales bucked the trend to survive the last Ice Age, say scientists.
The demise of cold-adapted land mammals such as mammoths has been linked to rising temperatures around 11,000 years ago.
But researchers were surprised to find a contrasting population boom for whales living off the coast of Britain.
Their study is also the first to discover that the ocean giants lived in the southern North Sea.

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An Ancient Biosonar Sheds New Light on the Evolution of Echolocation in Toothed Whales

Some thirty million years ago, Ganges river dolphins diverged from other toothed whales, making them one of the oldest species of aquatic mammals that use echolocation, or biosonar, to navigate and find food. This also makes them ideal subjects for scientists working to understand the evolution of echolocation among toothed whales.
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Naval explosions blamed for 70 whales stranding

An inquiry into Scotland's biggest whale stranding yet is understood to have blamed Naval explosions for the creatures' deaths.
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Mesoplodon traversii
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World's rarest whale seen for first time

The world's rarest whale has been seen for the first time after a mother and calf were washed up on a beach in New Zealand.
Spade-toothed beaked whales were first discovered in 1872 when bone fragments were found on a remote Pacific island, but until now the species has remained entirely hidden from human view.
In the 140 years since they were first discovered, the only sign that the creatures' continued existence lay in two partial skulls found in New Zealand in the 1950s and Chile in 1986.

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Humpback Whales Staying in Antarctic Bays Later into Autumn

Large numbers of humpback whales are remaining in bays along the Western Antarctic Peninsula to feast on krill late into the austral autumn, long after their annual migrations to distant breeding grounds were believed to begin, according to a new Duke University study.
The study, published today in the journal Endangered Species Research, provides the first density estimates for these whales in both open and enclosed habitats along the peninsula in late autumn.

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