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TOPIC: Tunguska impact site


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Tunguska Event
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At 7:17am on 30 June 1908, an immense explosion tore through the forest of central Siberia.
Some 80 million trees were flattened over an area of 2,000 square km (800 square miles) near the Tunguska River.
The blast was 1,000 times more powerful than the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and generated a shock wave that knocked people to the ground 60km from the epicentre.

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RE: Tunguska impact site
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A remote region of Siberia was rocked by a phenomenal explosion exactly 100 years ago. A fireball streaked across the sky, possibly at about 100,000km/h (62,000mph), and exploded high in the atmosphere.
It is believed to have been a large meteorite. It exploded in a blast equivalent to about 15 one-megaton atomic bombs, smashing flat 60 million trees over an area of more than 2,000 sq km (770 sq miles) in forest near the Tunguska river.

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 From June 26-28, Krasnoyarsk, a city in Central Siberia, hosted an all-Russian scientific and practical conference The Centenary of the Tunguska Event.
In the 20th century, Russia was the scene of two major impact events involving large meteorites. On February 12, 1947, a meteorite fell in the Sikhote-Alin mountain range, approximately 440 km. northeast of Vladivostok, Russia, gouging over 30 craters with a diameter of seven to 28 metres and up to six metres deep.
The impact area for this meteorite in the form of iron rain covered about 10 sq. km., from which about 27 metric tons of meteorite substances were recovered. About one per cent of the meteorites initial energy was released during impact, mostly dispersing into the atmosphere.

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Tunguska event
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It set off a massive explosion that flattened millions of trees in the Siberian wilderness and lit up the sky as far away as Britain.
A century later the Tunguska event still provokes intense debate over a blast 1,000 times more powerful than the Hiroshima bomb.

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Scientists will gather in Siberia to mark the 100th anniversary of the Tunguska Event, one of the world's most puzzling explosions.
The anniversary will be held from June 26-28. The mysterious explosion flattened 80 million trees but largely went unnoticed at the time.

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New Scientist features editor David Cohen narrates his journey to the site of the Tunguska explosion in Siberia.


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RE: Tunguska impact site
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Exactly 100 years ago a comet or an asteroid exploded a few kilometres above the Tunguska region of central Siberia, leaving a huge zone of destruction.
Despite many searches, no one has found any remnant of the impact body. Such evidence could help scientists gauge the danger posed today by medium-size comets or asteroids.
A team of Italian scientists has found evidence of a possible impact crater about 10 kilometres from ground zero. They will soon return to recover what may be a fragment of the cosmic object.

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Tunguska
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L

Posts: 129165
Date:
RE: Tunguska impact site
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