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Tunguska impact site
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Feuerraketen aus dem Boden ließen Taiga explodieren

1908 mähte eine Explosion in Sibirien Tausende Bäume um. Wilde Spekulationen folgten: War es ein Meteorit, Antimaterie oder gar ein Ufo? Jetzt vermuten Forscher eine vulkanische Ursache. Demnach schossen Feuerraketen aus der Erde - das könnte auch in Europa passieren.
Im Morgengrauen des 30. Juni 1908 ereignete sich in der Einöde Westsibiriens ein Inferno, dessen Ursache mysteriös geblieben ist. Ein gewaltiger Knall zerriss die Stille der Taiga am Fluss Tunguska, dann brannte die Luft: Ein Hitzesturm knickte alle Bäume um - in einem Gebiet fast so grob wie das Saarland. Noch in Europa sahen Menschen den Nachthorizont leuchten.
Trotz der vielen Zeugenberichte rätseln Wissenschaftler noch immer über die Ursache der Explosion. Am Montag präsentieren Geoforscher auf der Jahrestagung des Amerikanischen Geophysikalischen Union (AGU) in San Francisco nun Belege für eine erstaunliche Theorie: Demnach schossen in Tunguska vulkanische Feuerbomben aus dem Boden. Die Katastrophe könnte sich wiederholen, auch in Europa - und zwar ohne Vorwarnung.

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Mystery of Tunguska meteorite solved

102 years after the fall of the famous celestial body in Tunguska taiga, scientists finally managed to identify the crash site of one of its fragments and examine the unusual composition of the substance of this space creature. The study was conducted using a unique instrument - GPR. As a result, it was proved that it was not a meteorite, but a comet.
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On June 30, 1908, Trans-Siberian railroad passengers saw a fireball streaking across the sky. It exploded above the Tunguska River and flattened more than 1,000 square miles of forest. For 1,000 miles, the fireball was seen and heard.
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Lots of anniversaries to celebrate... 102 years ago today, over a remote region of Russia there was an air burst, caused by a meteor or a comet, just 3-5 miles above the earth. It was the largest event of this kind in recent history. Could it happen again? Find out on this week's SkyTalk.
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Do you know the Russian region of Evenki Autonomous District in the Krasnoyarsk Territory is famous with? You know, even if you don't know, that it is situated there. Tunguska phenomenon took place directly in this region in 1908, June, 30 at 7. 17 o'clock (local time). This phenomenon, also known as Tunguska meteorite, is still a thing exciting the imagination of scientists and ordinary people as well. Was it a meteorite, or an accident, happened with some spaceship or something else? It happened more than one hundred years ago but it is still discussed together with little green men and gossips about stars' private life. Now the place of mysterious catastrophe is a natural reserve and you can visit (even in three ways!) it and see with your own eyes the place above which the explosion, which made the sky above all the Europe to glow with strange coloured light for a few days, took place.
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The Tunguska Explosion, presumably caused by a comet, is the greatest space catastrophe humankind has ever witnessed. Even a century later, the Siberian blast still attracts scientists who hope to unveil its mystery.
A powerful explosion in East Siberia shook the Earth in the early morning of June 30, 1908, or June 17 in the Julian calendar that was then in use in the Russian Empire.


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More than 100 years have passed since the Tunguska Meteorite Event and the mystery of its occurrence remains unsolved, but scientists have not given up on solving the riddle. This July, an international research group from Italy and the United States ventured into deepest Siberia to investigate the most likely explanations of the mysterious event, and RIA Novosti correspondent David Burghardt joined them.

On June 30, 1908, Eastern Siberia was hit by an explosion equal to 2,000 times the nuclear bomb that destroyed the Japanese city of Hiroshima in 1945, destroying 2,200 square kilometres of taiga and flattening tens of millions of trees. If this impact had occurred four hours later, the city of St. Petersburg and other nearby villages would have been wiped off the face of the earth.

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