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Post Info TOPIC: Asteroid (21) Lutetia


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RE: Asteroid (21) Lutetia
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Lutetias dark side hosts hidden crater

Grooves found on Lutetia, an asteroid encountered by ESAs Rosetta spacecraft, point to the existence of a large impact crater on the unseen side of the rocky world.
Rosetta flew past Lutetia at a distance of 3168 km in July 2010, en route to its 2014 rendezvous with its target comet.
The spacecraft took images of the 100 km-wide asteroid for about two hours during the flyby, revealing numerous impact craters and hundreds of grooves all over the surface.

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Asteroid (21) Lutetia is at Opposition in the constellation Virgo on the 22nd March 2014

Magnitude: 11.0
Distance to Earth: 1.766 AU
Distance to Sun: 2.760 AU

Ephemeris 

Date    TT    R. A. (2000) Decl.     Delta      r     Elong.  Phase     Mag
2014 03 20    12 15 21.7 +03 28 12   1.7696  2.7622   174.4     2.0    11.0
2014 03 21    12 14 27.1 +03 34 08   1.7678  2.7613   175.0     1.8    11.0
2014 03 22    12 13 32.3 +03 40 02   1.7663  2.7604   175.3     1.7    11.0
2014 03 23    12 12 37.3 +03 45 54   1.7651  2.7594   175.2     1.7    11.0
2014 03 24    12 11 42.1 +03 51 44   1.7642  2.7585   174.9     1.8    11.0
2014 03 25    12 10 46.9 +03 57 31   1.7635  2.7576   174.3     2.0    11.0
2014 03 26    12 09 51.6 +04 03 15   1.7632  2.7566   173.6     2.3    11.1
2014 03 27    12 08 56.4 +04 08 55   1.7632  2.7557   172.7     2.7    11.1
2014 03 28    12 08 01.3 +04 14 31   1.7634  2.7547   171.7     3.0    11.1
2014 03 29    12 07 06.4 +04 20 03   1.7639  2.7537   170.6     3.4    11.1
2014 03 30    12 06 11.7 +04 25 29   1.7648  2.7528   169.5     3.8    11.2
2014 03 31    12 05 17.3 +04 30 51   1.7659  2.7518   168.4     4.2    11.2
2014 04 01    12 04 23.3 +04 36 07   1.7673  2.7508   167.3     4.6    11.2
2014 04 02    12 03 29.7 +04 41 17   1.7690  2.7498   166.2     5.0    11.2
2014 04 03    12 02 36.6 +04 46 21   1.7709  2.7488   165.0     5.4    11.3
2014 04 04    12 01 44.1 +04 51 18   1.7732  2.7478   163.9     5.8    11.3
2014 04 05    12 00 52.1 +04 56 09   1.7757  2.7468   162.7     6.2    11.3
2014 04 06    12 00 00.9 +05 00 52   1.7785  2.7458   161.5     6.6    11.3
2014 04 07    11 59 10.3 +05 05 28   1.7815  2.7448   160.4     7.0    11.3
2014 04 08    11 58 20.5 +05 09 55   1.7848  2.7438   159.2     7.4    11.4
2014 04 09    11 57 31.5 +05 14 15   1.7884  2.7428   158.0     7.9    11.4
2014 04 10    11 56 43.4 +05 18 27   1.7922  2.7417   156.9     8.3    11.4
2014 04 11    11 55 56.2 +05 22 30   1.7963  2.7407   155.7     8.7    11.4
2014 04 12    11 55 09.9 +05 26 24   1.8007  2.7397   154.5     9.1    11.5
2014 04 13    11 54 24.7 +05 30 10   1.8053  2.7386   153.4     9.4    11.5
2014 04 14    11 53 40.5 +05 33 46   1.8101  2.7376   152.2     9.8    11.5
2014 04 15    11 52 57.3 +05 37 13   1.8152  2.7365   151.1    10.2    11.5
2014 04 16    11 52 15.3 +05 40 31   1.8205  2.7355   149.9    10.6    11.5
2014 04 17    11 51 34.4 +05 43 40   1.8261  2.7344   148.8    11.0    11.6
2014 04 18    11 50 54.7 +05 46 38   1.8318  2.7333   147.7    11.3    11.6
2014 04 19    11 50 16.1 +05 49 27   1.8378  2.7322   146.5    11.7    11.6
2014 04 20    11 49 38.8 +05 52 07   1.8440  2.7312   145.4    12.1    11.6
2014 04 21    11 49 02.8 +05 54 36   1.8505  2.7301   144.3    12.4    11.6
2014 04 22    11 48 28.1 +05 56 55   1.8571  2.7290   143.2    12.8    11.7
2014 04 23    11 47 54.7 +05 59 04   1.8640  2.7279   142.1    13.1    11.7
2014 04 24    11 47 22.6 +06 01 03   1.8710  2.7268   141.0    13.4    11.7
2014 04 25    11 46 51.9 +06 02 52   1.8783  2.7257   139.9    13.8    11.7
2014 04 26    11 46 22.5 +06 04 30   1.8858  2.7245   138.8    14.1    11.7
2014 04 27    11 45 54.6 +06 05 58   1.8934  2.7234   137.7    14.4    11.8
2014 04 28    11 45 28.1 +06 07 16   1.9012  2.7223   136.6    14.7    11.8
2014 04 29    11 45 03.1 +06 08 23   1.9093  2.7212   135.6    15.0    11.8
2014 04 30    11 44 39.5 +06 09 20   1.9175  2.7200   134.5    15.3    11.8


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Asteroid (21) Lutetia is at Opposition on the 23rd December, 2012.

Magnitude: 10.5
Distance to Earth: 1.600 au 
Distance to Sun: 2.584 au



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Ephemeris

Date       UT      R.A. (J2000) Decl.    Delta     r     El.    Ph.  Mag
2012 12 22 000000 06 07 55.6 +24 19 09   1.599   2.582  178.3   0.6  10.6
2012 12 23 000000 06 06 47.3 +24 20 30   1.600   2.584  179.1   0.4  10.5
2012 12 24 000000 06 05 39.1 +24 21 48   1.602   2.585  178.5   0.6  10.5
2012 12 25 000000 06 04 31.1 +24 23 03   1.604   2.587  177.4   1.0  10.6
2012 12 26 000000 06 03 23.3 +24 24 15   1.606   2.589  176.2   1.4  10.6
2012 12 27 000000 06 02 16.0 +24 25 25   1.609   2.590  175.0   1.9  10.7
2012 12 28 000000 06 01 09.1 +24 26 31   1.612   2.592  173.7   2.4  10.7
2012 12 29 000000 06 00 02.7 +24 27 36   1.615   2.593  172.4   2.9  10.8
2012 12 30 000000 05 58 56.9 +24 28 37   1.619   2.595  171.2   3.3  10.8
2012 12 31 000000 05 57 51.8 +24 29 36   1.622   2.596  169.9   3.8  10.8
2013 01 01 000000 05 56 47.4 +24 30 32   1.627   2.598  168.7   4.3  10.9
2013 01 02 000000 05 55 43.9 +24 31 25   1.631   2.599  167.4   4.7  10.9
2013 01 03 000000 05 54 41.3 +24 32 17   1.636   2.601  166.2   5.2  10.9
2013 01 04 000000 05 53 39.7 +24 33 05   1.641   2.603  164.9   5.6  11.0
2013 01 05 000000 05 52 39.1 +24 33 51   1.646   2.604  163.7   6.1  11.0
2013 01 06 000000 05 51 39.6 +24 34 35   1.651   2.606  162.4   6.5  11.0
2013 01 07 000000 05 50 41.3 +24 35 17   1.657   2.607  161.2   7.0  11.1
2013 01 08 000000 05 49 44.2 +24 35 56   1.663   2.609  159.9   7.4  11.1
2013 01 09 000000 05 48 48.4 +24 36 33   1.669   2.610  158.7   7.9  11.1
2013 01 10 000000 05 47 54.0 +24 37 09   1.676   2.612  157.5   8.3  11.2


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The Moon will occult the magnitude 9.7 asteroid (21) Lutetia at ~06:00 UT, 15th July, 2012.
The event is visible from the UK, Scandinavia and northern Russia.

Lutetia-2012-7-15-6h08mb.gif 
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A fleeting flyby of a battered world

The long and tumultuous history of asteroid Lutetia was revealed by ESA's Rosetta spacecraft as it raced past this large, ancient asteroid.
This spectacular movie shows a sequence of images snapped by Rosetta as it flew past the main-belt asteroid on 10 July 2010.

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 Flyby of the asteroid Lutetia by the ESA probe Rosetta.
(July 2010)


Credit  planetaryprobes



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Title: The Cratering History of Asteroid (21) Lutetia
Authors: S. Marchi (1), M. Massironi (2), J.-B. Vincent (3), A. Morbidelli (1), S. Mottola (4), F. Marzari (2), M. Kueppers (5), S. Besse (6), N. Thomas (7), C. Barbieri (2), G. Naletto (2), H. Sierks (3) ((1) OCA, (2) University of Padova, (3) MPS, (4) DLR, (5) ESAC, (6) LAM, (7) University of Bern)

The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft passed by the main belt asteroid (21) Lutetia the 10th July 2010. With its ~100km size, Lutetia is one of the largest asteroids ever imaged by a spacecraft. During the flyby, the on-board OSIRIS imaging system acquired spectacular images of Lutetia's northern hemisphere revealing a complex surface scarred by numerous impact craters, reaching the maximum dimension of about 55km. In this paper, we assess the cratering history of the asteroid. For this purpose, we apply current models describing the formation and evolution of main belt asteroids, that provide the rate and velocity distributions of impactors. These models, coupled with appropriate crater scaling laws, allow us to interpret the observed crater size-frequency distribution (SFD) and constrain the cratering history. Thanks to this approach, we derive the crater retention age of several regions on Lutetia, namely the time lapsed since their formation or global surface reset. We also investigate the influence of various factors -like Lutetia's bulk structure and crater obliteration- on the observed crater SFDs and the estimated surface ages. From our analysis, it emerges that Lutetia underwent a complex collisional evolution, involving major local resurfacing events till recent times. The difference in crater density between the youngest and oldest recognized units implies a difference in age of more than a factor of 10. The youngest unit (Beatica) has an estimated age of tens to hundreds of Myr, while the oldest one (Achaia) formed during a period when the bombardment of asteroids was more intense than the current one, presumably around 3.6Gyr ago or older.

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Lutetia: a Rare Survivor from the Birth of the Earth

eso1144a.jpg

New observations indicate that the asteroid Lutetia is a leftover fragment of the same original material that formed the Earth, Venus and Mercury. Astronomers have combined data from ESA's Rosetta spacecraft, ESO's New Technology Telescope, and NASA telescopes. They found that the properties of the asteroid closely match those of a rare kind of meteorites found on Earth and thought to have formed in the inner parts of the Solar System. Lutetia must, at some point, have moved out to its current location in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.
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New analysis of Lutetia finds evidence for molten interior.

On July 10, 2010, the European Space Agency's Rosetta probe flew by the asteroid 21 Lutetia, which at the time was the largest asteroid ever to have been visited by a spacecraft. The fly-by occurred 282 million miles from Earth; close-up images taken by the probe revealed cracks and craters running across Lutetia's surface, evidence of the asteroid's long and battered history.
Now an international team of researchers from France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United States has analysed Lutetias surface images, and found that underneath its cold and cracked exterior, the asteroid may in fact have once harboured a molten-hot, metallic core. The findings suggest that Lutetia, despite billions of years of impacts, may have retained its original structure - a preserved remnant of the very earliest days of the solar system.

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