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Laser helps unlock antimatter secrets

Scientists at Cern have found a new way to unlock the secrets of antimatter.
In a major technological advance, physicists shone a laser on trapped anti-atoms to detect whether they behaved any differently to atoms.
The work could shed light on one of the enduring mysteries about antimatter
 
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Mystery of the missing antimatter

Giant screw-like magnetic fields in space could offer clues to why there is something rather than nothing in the universe.
According to cosmologists, the Big Bang should have produced equal amounts of matter and antimatter that would almost immediately annihilate each other, leaving a universe that was practically empty. Yet, here we are.
But where is the cosmic antimatter?

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CERN experiment takes us one step closer to discovering where all the antimatter went

New research published today by researchers from CERN has brought us a step closer to understanding where all the antimatter has gone. This matter-antimatter asymmetry is one of the greatest challenges in physics and at this moment in time the universe seems to be composed entirely of matter the only antimatter around is created by us at places like CERN. Yet our theories predict that exactly equal amounts of matter and antimatter would have been created in the Big Bang. So where did all the antimatter go?
This new research, undertaken by the ALPHA experiment at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator (AD) in Geneva, is the first time that the electric charge of an anti-atom has been measured to high precision. Measuring the electric charge of antihydrogen atoms is a way to study any subtle differences between matter and antimatter which could account for the lack of antimatter in the universe.

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CERN's ALPHA experiment measures charge of antihydrogen

In a paper published in the journal Nature Communications today, the ALPHA experiment at CERN1's Antiproton Decelerator (AD) reports a measurement of the electric charge of antihydrogen atoms, finding it to be compatible with zero to eight decimal places. Although this result comes as no surprise, since hydrogen atoms are electrically neutral, it is the first time that the charge of an antiatom has been measured to high precision.
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Anti-matter
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UW-Madison scientists help explain scarcity of anti-matter

A collaboration with major participation by physicists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has made a precise measurement of elusive, nearly massless particles, and obtained a crucial hint as to why the universe is dominated by matter, not by its close relative, anti-matter.
The particles, called anti-neutrinos, were detected at the underground Daya Bay experiment, located near a nuclear reactor in China, 55 kilometres north of Hong Kong.
For the measurement of anti-neutrinos it made in 2012, the Daya Bay collaboration has been named runner-up for breakthrough of the year from Science magazine.

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Cern discovery points to new model of universe

Cern, Europe's nuclear research centre, announced last July it had discovered a particle, now widely believed to be the famous Higgs boson. Although scientists are 99.999 per cent certain it is the Higgs, the final confirmation from them wont come until more data can be assembled.
However, the new discovery has nothing to do with the Higgs and relates to a substance called antimatter. The scientists are only 99.9 per cent sure about their antimatter discovery, but if true it could represent "new physics", said Dr Tara Shears of Cern.

"We have no way to explain this," she said yesterday in Aberdeen during a talk about Cern at the British Festival of Science. "We call it new physics because we don't know what it is."

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Antihydrogen
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 Getting to grips with antihydrogen

Newspapers and magazines around the world described the recent ALPHA announcement as the first step towards explaining why antimatter and matter did not cancel each other out in the first instances of creation, that is, why our universe of matter exists. Understanding the behaviour of matter and antimatter can help scientists solve this conundrum. With this in mind, the ALPHA collaboration has begun the study of the antihydrogen spectrum.
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An Antimatter Breakthrough

On 7 March, the journal Nature published the latest results from the ALPHA experiment at CERN. The findings were called "historic." ALPHA first made science history in 2010, when they created atoms of anti-hydrogen; in 2011 they succeeded in trapping and holding these atoms for an astonishing 1000 seconds. In these three short films, members of the ALPHA collaboration explain their latest triumph, revealing the excitement behind this extraordinary scientific process.



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CERN experiment makes spectroscopic measurement of antihydrogen

In a paper published online today by the journal Nature, the ALPHA collaboration at CERN1 reports an important milestone on the way to measuring the properties of antimatter atoms. This follows news reported in June last year that the collaboration had routinely trapped antihydrogen atoms for long periods of time. ALPHA's latest advance is the next important milestone on the way to being able to make precision comparisons between atoms of ordinary matter and atoms of antimatter, thereby helping to unravel one of the deepest mysteries in particle physics and perhaps understanding why a Universe of matter exists at all.
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New twist in antimatter mystery

Physicists have taken a step forward in their efforts to understand why the Universe is dominated by matter, and not its shadowy opposite antimatter.
A US experiment has confirmed previous findings that hinted at new phenomena outside our understanding of physics.
The results show that certain matter particles decay differently from their antimatter counterparts.

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