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Viking shipyard
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Aerial surveys of Viking shipyard on Skye

Aerial surveys are being carried out over Skye to help archaeologists investigate a 12th Century Viking shipbuilding site.
Boat timbers, a stone-built quay and a canal have already been uncovered at Loch na h-Airde on Skye's Rubh an Dunain peninsula.
The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland (RCAHMS) has launched the air surveys.

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RE: Ancient Viking ships
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A 1,000-year-old Viking longship is thought to have been discovered under a pub car park on Merseyside.
The vessel is believed to lie beneath 2m to 3m of clay by the Railway Inn in Meols, Wirral, where Vikings are known to have settled.

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Viking burial.kmz
Google Earth file

Latitude: 53.4012° Longitude: -3.15911°

-- Edited by Blobrana at 17:04, 2008-01-12

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Viking burial mound
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A Viking burial mound  was opened by archaeologists on Monday.  They hope to learn more about two women - possibly a queen and a princess - laid to rest there 1,173 years ago.
In 1904, the mound in southeastern Norway's Vestfold County surrendered one of the country's greatest archaeological treasures, the Oseberg Viking longboat, which is now on display at the Viking Ship Museum in Oslo.
The 65-foot vessel was buried in 834 in the enormous mound as the grave ship for a rich and powerful Viking woman, according to the museum.
The remains of the two women, one believed to have been in her 60s and the other in her 30s, were first exhumed during the ship excavation. They were reburied in the mound in 1948 - in a modern aluminium casket placed inside a five-ton stone sarcophagus - in hopes that future scientific methods might reveal their secrets.
When experts opened the sarcophagus Monday, it was filled with water, although the casket itself may not have been flooded.

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RE: Ancient Viking ships
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In 1938, a labourer building a pub car park in Wirral unearthed part of an old boat 3 metres below ground. His foreman told him to cover it up quickly, because an archaeological dig would have slowed down construction, costing time and money. Nearly 70 years later, investigators are finally close to solving the mystery of the vessel. Radar scans have revealed the outline of a what appears to be a Viking boat beneath the car park of the Railway Inn at Meols. The only other known examples in Britain were unearthed at Balladoole on the Isle of Man and Sanday in Orkney.

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On Sunday, 65 men and women will embark on one of the most ambitious, dangerous and important experimental archaeology projects ever undertaken.
They will attempt to sail a reconstructed Viking warship from Roskilde, Denmark, to Dublin, across some of the roughest seas in the world.
The ship, the Sea Stallion from Glendalough, is the most authentic Viking warship built in nine centuries. It's based on the largest of five ships that were excavated from the bottom of Roskilde fjord in 1962, opposite the small village of Skuldelev.

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Giant Viking longship sets sail
On the skippers command, deckhands hauled in tarred ropes to lower the flax sail. Oars splashed into the water. The crew, grimacing with strain, pulled with steady strokes sending the sleek Viking longship gliding through the fjord.
A thousand years ago, the curved-prow warship might have spewed out hordes of bloodthirsty Norsemen ready to pillage and burn.
This time, the spoils are adventure rather than plunder.
The Sea Stallion of Glendalough is billed as the worlds biggest and most ambitious Viking ship reconstruction, modelled after a warship excavated in 1962 from the Roskilde fjord in Denmark after being buried in the seabed for nearly 950 years.

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Havhingsten
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An 11th century Viking longship, the Havhingsten, that has been entirely restored to its original condition will cross the North Sea this summer powered only by its sails, a Danish Viking ship museum said on Tuesday.
The ship will leave Roskilde, Denmark, where the museum is located, on July 1 and is expected to arrive in Dublin on August 14.

"This is a new challenge. We used the tools the Vikings used to rebuild the Havhingsten fra Glendalough and now we are going to test the ship's resistance" - Preben Rather Soerensen,  project leader.

Sixty-five sailors will man the 30m vessel, which will have no engine and will rely entirely on its typically square Viking sail. The oars will only be used in ports for delicate manoeuvres.

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Viking Sunstones
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Vikings may have used a special crystal called a sunstone to help navigate the seas even when the sun was obscured by fog or cloud, a study has suggested.
Researchers from Hungary ran a test with sunstones in the Arctic ocean, and found that the crystals can reveal the sun's position even in bad weather.
This would have allowed the Vikings to navigate successfully, they say.
The sunstone theory has been around for 40 years, but some academics have treated it with extreme scepticism.
Researcher Gabor Horvath from Eotvos University in Budapest led a team that spent a month recording polarisation - how rays of light display different properties in different directions - in the Arctic.
Polarisation cannot be seen with the naked eye, but it can be viewed with what are known as birefringent crystals, or sunstones.

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Ancient Viking ships
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A row has broken out in Norway over a decision to move three ancient Viking ships, which may not survive the journey.
The University of Oslo has decided to move three longships, probably by lorry and barge, to a new museum, despite dire warnings that the thousand-year-old oak vessels could fall apart en route.
A retired curator of Oslo's current Viking Ship Museum has said that the delicately preserved ships, two of which are nearly 80ft long, were almost equal in archaeological importance to the Pyramids.

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