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RE: Stromboli
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Stromboli, an island volcano north of Sicily, starting erupting on Wednesday afternoon, the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV) said.
Tourist trips have been cancelled as the volcano remains "too active"

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Stromboli Volcano
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Red-hot magma spews from Italy's Stromboli Volcano every 5 to 20 minutes thanks to tiny bubbles of magma that build up and pop a cork inside the volcano, according to a new study that forces some rethinking about how the historically eruptive mountain works.
Stromboli fires when a sponge-like plug, similar to a cork in a champagne bottle, fractures every few minutes due to pressure created by the gas bubbles. This new idea challenges an old theory about what causes Stromboli to erupt, and may help scientists predict how often other volcanoes like it will blow.

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The Aeolian Islands are a group of small volcanic islands off the north coast of Sicily. The largest island is Lipari, and rather confusingly, the archipelago is often referred to as the Lipari Islands.
Whichever name you wish to call them, the islands are worth a visit. It is curious that they would be named in honour of the Greek God Aeolus, because he was the Greek God of the wind, and when there is much wind, the islands are not a good place to be with a boat.
The best-known island is the northernmost one, Stromboli, which is an active volcano. In Europe, only Stromboli, the nearby Etna on Sicily and a couple of volcanoes in Iceland are classed as active.

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Strombolian activity
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Like rising bubbles in champagne, gases from Earths interior can ascend to the surface and cause magma to explode in dangerous splatters.
A new study, detailed in the July 13 issue of the journal Science, shows that these volcanic gas slugs originate from deeper inside the planet than previously thought.
The work, by Mike Burton and colleagues at the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology in Italy, could help scientists understand why some volcanoes erupt more violently than others.

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Stromboli
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The volcano on the tiny Sicilian island of Stromboli erupted in a shower of small stones and ash, but it posed no danger to the few hundred people living nearby, authorities said Friday.
The eruption late Thursday was the latest activity from Stromboli, located 40 miles north of Sicily.

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15.21589E_38.79175N
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Latitude: 38.79341 Longitude: 15.21242

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Stromboli Volcano
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A volcano on the Italian island of Stromboli, close to the north coast of Sicily, has begun spewing lava.
Two new craters have opened at the summit and one of the lava streams has already started flowing into the sea.
Civil defence authorities have begun emergency procedures and coastguard patrol boats have been deployed.
The population of 750 people has been urged to stay away from the coast. The last major eruption in 2002 caused a collapse that led to a small tsunami.
The wave reached 10 metres high and caused serious damage to Stromboli village on the north of the island.

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Stromboli
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Title: Simulations of the 30 December 2002 Stromboli tsunami, Italy
Authors: Tinti, S.; Pagnoni, G.; Zaniboni, F.; Armigliato, A.

Stromboli is a volcanic island in southern Tyrrhenian sea, Italy, known to have unstable flanks. The Sciara del Fuoco (SdF) on its NW flank is a deep scar produced by a huge sector collapse in the order of 1 Km cubic meters that very likely originated a large tsunami in Holocenic time. Since that collapse, the SdF was progressively refilled by eruption products, and is nowadays a steep sector mostly formed by poorly consolidated heterogeneous rocks. On 30 December 2002 two large slides with a total volume estimated around 17 millions cubic meters detached from the SdF slope and generated a tsunami that caused severe destruction in the island, produced some damage in the Aeolian archipelago, and was observed in several coastal places in the south-Tyrrhenian sea. Here the event is simulated numerically. The mass failure is simulated by means of a block model, implying that the mass is subdivided into a number of interacting blocks sliding down the volcanic flank. In the simulations the block gain soon very high velocities, owing to the large steepness of the slope. The tsunami is simulated through a finite-element model in the near-field over a domain covering Stromboli and Panarea. The results of the simulations agree with the observations collected after the event. Within a few minutes time, the entire coast of Stromboli is attacked by the tsunami, and it takes only 5 minutes to the tsunami to attack the neighbouring island of Panarea.

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15.21286E_38.78980N
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Latitude:, 38.789N; Longitude:, 15.213E

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