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Higgs mass
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Title: Higgs mass from cosmological and astrophysical measurements
Authors: L. A. Popa (Institute of Space Science, Bucharest)

For a robust interpretation of upcoming observations from Planck and LHC experiments it is imperative to understand how the inflationary dynamics of a non-minimally coupled Higgs scalar field may affect the degeneracy of the inflationary observables. We constrain the inflationary observables and the Higgs boson mass during observable inflation by fitting the the Higgs inflationary potential directly to WMAP5+BAO+SN data. We obtain a Higgs mass a value of 143.73+14.97/-6.31 GeV at 95% CL for the central value of top quark mass. We also show that the inflation driven by a non-minimally coupled scalar field leads to significant changes of the inflationary parameters when compared with the similar constraints from the standard inflation.

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RE: Higgs Particles
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Two physicists recently put forth a new theory on why the accelerator has encountered so many delays. Holger Bech Nielsen, of the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, and Masao Ninomiya of the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics in Kyoto, Japan, suggest that the hypothesised Higgs boson would have such harmful effects that the particle is essentially travelling back through time to stop its own creation.
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Higgs Boson theory depicted in new artwork on display at Imperial
An artwork depicting the Higgs Boson is on display in the Central Library on Imperial's South Kensington Campus as part of its tour of scientific institutions around the world.

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Higgs boson
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Analysing several years' worth of results from Fermilab's Tevatron collider, physicists come up with the most accurate measurement to date of the mass of the W boson, and narrow down the possible mass of the still undiscovered Higgs boson
Over the past three decades or more, physicists have developed their experimental and theoretical understanding of the world of subatomic particles into a comprehensive theory known as the standard model. Much of the standard model has been verified and tested, but one particle--the Higgs boson--has so far escaped detection.
The Higgs boson is a crucial element in the electroweak part of the standard model, which provides a unified theoretical account of the electromagnetic interaction and the weak nuclear interaction (involved in radioactive beta decay, among other things). The W and Z bosons, also predicted by electroweak unification, were found more than 25 years ago, but final confirmation of this part of the standard model must wait for conclusive detection of the Higgs boson.
That goal has come a little nearer with two recent announcements, both the result of years of data collection and analysis, from experimental teams at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois. One achievement is the most precise measurement yet of the W boson's mass. The other shrinks the mass range where the Higgs boson--if indeed it exists--must be hiding. The teams released their news at the Rencontres de Moriond, an annual particle physics meeting that ran from March 7-14, 2009, in the Italian Alps.

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RE: Higgs Particles
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It's pretty clear that the standard model of physics is not enough to explain all the phenomena in nature. Through looking at a variety of phenomena one of them being dark matter we know that there is a whole set of interactions beyond our standard model - Tomasz Skwarnicki.

Skwarnickis work doesnt deal with dark matter, but the Syracuse University physicist has been working on models of physics that go beyond the standard.

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A row between two of the worlds most famous scientists yesterday threatened to overshadow the celebrations as the worlds greatest scientific experiment got under way.
Professor Peter Higgs, the scientist who gave his name to the Higgs boson, the particle at the centre of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiment, launched a withering attack on Professor Stephen Hawking, saying his work was not good enough.
Professor Higgs dismissed the views on the 2.6 billion project of the man generally considered to be the greatest physicist of his time, and said that no other particle physicist would view his approach as correct.
Both men are contenders for the Nobel prize depending on the outcome of the experiment and their spat is likely to send shockwaves through the scientific Establishment.

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The Large Hadron Collider is the latest attempt to move fundamental physics past the frustratingly successful 'standard model'. But it is not the only way to do it. Geoff Brumfiel surveys the contenders attempting to capture the prize before the collider gets up to speed.

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Title: Light MSSM Higgs boson scenario and its test at hadron colliders
Authors: Alexander Belyaev, Qing-Hong Cao, Daisuke Nomura, Kazuhiro Tobe, C.-P. Yuan

We show that in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, the possibility for the lightest CP-even Higgs boson to be lighter than Z boson (as low as about 60 GeV) is, contrary to the usual belief, not yet excluded by LEP2 data or any other existing experimental data. The characteristic of the light Higgs boson scenario (LHS) is that the ZZh coupling and the decay branching ratio Br(h/A \to b\bar{b}) are simultaneously suppressed as a result of generic supersymmetric loop corrections. Consequently, the W^ H^ h coupling has to be large due to the sum rule of Higgs couplings to weak gauge bosons. In addition to discussing the potential of the Tevatron and B-factories to test the LHS, we show that the associate neutral and charged Higgs boson production process, pp \to H^ h (A), can completely probe LHS at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

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The Higgs boson has been moonlighting. Not content with its day job of giving other particles their mass, it may also have driven the expansion of the early universe, given a little tinkering, according to two separate studies.
Soon after the big bang the early universe is believed to have undergone a period of rapid expansion, known as inflation. The idea is that hypothetical particles, aptly named "inflatons", drove this expansion by pushing space apart.
But there's a problem.

"If you ask cosmologists what the inflaton actually is, they will stumble. We need a connection between the inflaton and particles that we know about" - Anupam Mazumdar at Lancaster University in the UK.

That's where the Higgs boson comes in. Although yet to make an appearance, it would seem to be the perfect candidate for the inflaton because the Higgs is the only particle with the "negative pressure" required to inflate the universe.

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