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Disaster officials seek clarity over Manam volcano

The National Disaster Office in Papua New Guinea is sending an assessment team to the area affected by the Manam volcanic eruption because they say they have been kept in the dark by local authorities.
The mountain burst into life last Friday for the first time in 11 years.

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Manam Volcano Erupts in Papua New Guinea

The Manam volcano in Papua New Guinea sent up a major eruption on Friday, local time, the first of its kind in almost 11 years.
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On August 9, 2006, two volcanoes in the region of Papua New Guinea emitted plumes at the same time. The Aqua satellite managed to catch both volcanoes in the act. The images of Manam and of Langila show the volcanic plume that is easily distinguished from the nearby clouds by its grey-beige colour. Both plumes blow toward the northwest.

Manam Volcano
Position: Latitude: 4.10°S Longitude: 145.061°E

Just north of mainland Papua New Guinea, Manam Volcano occupies an island just 10 kilometres wide. Its summit sports two craters, and historical eruptions have been observed there since the 17th century. It remains one of Papua New Guinea’s most active volcanoes. On the western end of the island of New Britain, Langila Volcano is one of that island’s most active volcanoes. The volcano actually consists of four overlapping cones. Recorded eruptions have occurred at Langila since the 19th century.

Langila
Position: Latitude: 5.525°S Longitude: 148.42°E
Langila Volcano, in Papua New Guinea’s West New Britain province, has erupted continuously since June 2, 2005.

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The 10-km-wide island of Manam is a 1807 metre high basaltic stratovolcano 12 km north of Papua New Guinea.

manam250506
Latitude: 4.10°S Longitude: 145.061°E
Credit NASA

Manam Volcano continued to emit a volcanic plume of ash and steam on May 25, 2006.
The Aqua satellite took this picture the same day. In this image, a faint plume moves away from the volcano toward the northwest. The volcanic plume is thinner and darker that the bright, fluffy clouds near the volcano’s summit. Brown-green sediment plumes from mainland Papua New Guinea continue to push into the ocean.

Frequent historical eruptions have been recorded at Manam since 1616. A major eruption in 1919 produced pyroclastic flows that reached the coast, and in 1957-58 pyroclastic flows descended down four radial valleys. Lava flows reached the sea in 1946-47 and 1958.
In October of 1994, a major explosive eruption at Manam sent a plume 10 km above the vent.
Two summit craters are present; both are active, although most historical eruptions have originated from the southern crater.

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