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L

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RE: Mount Hekla
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There have been lots of people all over the internet who are being concerned about the eruption of Hekla volcano. But it seems that people have only created a false rumour that the Hekla volcano is about to erupt. This issue has created big noise especially in twitter and the explosion rumour was the topic in the internet. It has been confirmed that the Hekla eruption issues is just a false alarm.
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View of the Hekla volcano, Burfell, Iceland. Burfell is about 700 meters high mountain. Hekla is approximately 1500 meters high.

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-- Edited by Blobrana on Monday 19th of April 2010 05:08:27 PM

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@Bob
Wikipedia has excellent  information about it, and some useful links (at bottom of its page).

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Bob

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I have Mt.Hekla is my vocano for my science report and was wondering if you had any information.


Bob


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Iceland's Hekla Could Erupt with Short Notice

Freysteinn Sigmundsson, geophysicist at the University of Iceland's Institute of Earth Sciences, believes that the volcano Hekla in south Iceland could erupt with short notice. However, it is difficult to predict when the volcano will start to erupt.
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Icelandic volcanoes star in live webcam broadcasts

It is now possible to watch Icelands Hekla volcano live on RUVs website. The camera was set up on Burfell and has a great view of Hekla, live and 24/7.
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Hekla volcano webcam
Katla volcano webcam

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L

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Mount Hekla is one of Iceland's most active volcanoes. It was known to islanders as the "Gateway to Hell" - with good reason. When it erupted in 1159 BC the effects were felt hundreds of miles away. In Scotland the whole of the west coast was devastated. A sulphuric cloud of ash and acid rain fell on the land, a tsunami raced across the sea and the sun was hidden for years. Such an event immediately changed the lives of the inhabitants of what we now call Scotland and may well have permanently changed their way of life.
Alistair Moffat, author of Before Scotland, has no doubt that when Hekla blew, the west coast inhabitants must have heard the boom and panicked. Moffat thinks they would have been in no doubt that the god's were angry. The eruption would have been heralded with ferocious electrical storms and the weather would have changed. These people, who we think lived by gathering food from the sea, would have seen their livelihood disappear. The sea changed, crops would have failed and afterwards, for a generation, there was no summer.

"We know it happened because of dendochronology. By measuring tree rings in ancient trees you can see that it was a climate-changing event. It shows that for 18 to 20 years there were no summers"- Alistair Moffat.

Faced with this, Moffat maintains that the people would have had little choice. They must have moved, quitting the populous west coast and moving east.

"My own view is that people moved to avoid the anger of the gods" - Alistair Moffat.

This sudden influx of people moving east resulted in a change from a hunter-gatherer society into a much more warrior-like one.

"Archaeological records support this. There were more swords and less ploughshares found – a crude way of putting it. The decorative jewellery too speaks of a warrior elite" - Alistair Moffat.

Moffat believes that the pressure for land led to the creation of what he describes as a "iron warlords" – people who won their honour and wealth through battle and protecting land.
It is possible that people's religious lives also changed in reaction to the cataclysmic events after Hekla. Moffat believes that people in prehistoric Scotland started to worship by water hoping to propitiate the gods who could command the seas. This worship took the form of placing expensive goods in watery or boggy places.

"These objects were items of value. It's like us throwing bars of gold into the water." - Alistair Moffat.

Nowhere is this more evident than in Duddingston Loch, Edinburgh. In 1778 a massive find of 53 late Bronze Age weapons were dredged from the loch. Moffat believes they were put there during a ritual. And who can blame these people for trying to get on the right side of these gods whom they thought had such power.

Source: The Scotsman

Helka
Latitude:, 63°59'23.83"N. Longitude:, 19°40'54.58"W

The 1491 metre high stratovolcano Hekla lies near the southern end of the eastern rift zone in southern Iceland. The perpetually snow-covered volcano is the most active volcano on the island, having erupted over twenty times since 1104. Extensive lava flows from Hekla's historical eruptions cover much of the volcano's flanks. Major eruptions occurred in 1300, 1766, and 1947. The most recent eruption was on 26 February 2000.
Hekla occupies a rift-transform junction. A 5.5-km-long fissure, Heklugjá, cuts across the volcano and is often active along its full length during major eruptions.

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