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Post Info TOPIC: Deepest Dinosaur


L

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RE: Deepest Dinosaur
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Fossilised dinosaur bones have been previously found all over Europe but never in Norway. The ancient rock formations in mainland Norway are too old to reveal any traces of dinosaurs.

"Its taken nine years, but now we finally know the animal to which the bone belongs and what this dinosaur looked like and how it lived" - Morten Bergan, RWE Dea geologist, discoverer of the first Norwegian dinosaur.

The dinosaur bone is now being exhibited at the Museum of Natural History in Oslo.

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L

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Microscopic examination of the specimen showed it to be identical in structure to bones from a Plateosaurus species.


Credit: Jorn Harald Hurum

200 million years ago, there was a desert between Norway and Greenland crossed by meandering rivers, and at the time, this dinosaur was the most common type found in Europe.

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The Norwegians have found Norway's first dinosaur using a oil exploration drill in the North Sea, at 2256 metres below the seabed. It had been there for nearly 200 million years, ever since the time the North Sea was an enormous alluvial plane.

It is merely a coincidence that the remains of the old dinosaur now see the light of day again, or more precisely, parts of the dinosaur. The fossil is in fact just a crushed knucklebone in a drilling core a long cylinder of rock drilled out from an exploration well at the Snorre offshore field.
Norway's first dinosaur fossil is a Plateosaurus, a species that could be up to nine metres long and weigh up to four tons. It lived in Europe and on Greenland 210 to 195 million years ago, at the end of the Triassic Period.
The Plateosaurus at the Snorre offshore field had a hollow grave. The fossil, which was found 2256 metres below the seabed, represents the world's deepest dinosaur finding. But it is by no means certain that the record-breaking knucklebone is a rarity down there in the abyss.
In fact, the old North Sea land was once a huge area where big rivers meandered through dry plains. Now the landscape has been compressed to form a pattern of fossil alluvial sand between banks of red shale.

Source : The Research Council of Norway

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