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Post Info TOPIC: MACS J1423.8+2404


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Posts: 131433
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MACS 1423-z7p64
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Primordial Galaxy Discovered, First of Its Kind

Seven years of meticulous observing have resulted in a cosmic discovery that comes from an era dating back 13.1 billion years, giving scientists a detailed glimpse of what may have happened just after the Big Bang.
Using the world-class W. M. Keck Observatory on Maunakea, Hawaii, an international team of astronomers from the United States, Australia, and Europe has confirmed the existence of one of the most distant galaxies in the universe.

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MACS1423-z7p64
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Astronomers detect ultra-faint galaxy from the very early universe

Peering way back in time, astronomers have discovered the faintest galaxy ever detected in the early universe.
No more than a few pixels in Hubble images, the galaxy appears as it did 13.1 billion years ago - just 700 million years after the big bang.
The discovery, reported in the journal Nature Astronomy, sheds light on a critical period in the evolution of the universe.

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Title: Spectroscopic confirmation of an ultra-faint galaxy at the epoch of reionization
Author: Austin Hoag, Marua Bradac, Michele Trenti, Tommaso Treu, Kasper B. Schmidt, Kuang-Han Huang, Brian C. Lemaux, Julie He, Stephanie R. Bernard, Louis E. Abramson, Charlotte A. Mason, Takahiro Mori****a, Laura Pentericci, Tim Schrabback

Within one billion years of the Big Bang, intergalactic hydrogen was ionized by sources emitting ultraviolet and higher energy photons. This was the final phenomenon to globally affect all the baryons (visible matter) in the Universe. It is referred to as cosmic reionization and is an integral component of cosmology. It is broadly expected that intrinsically faint galaxies were the primary ionizing sources due to their abundance in this epoch. However, at the highest redshifts (z>7.5; lookback time 13.1 Gyr), all galaxies with spectroscopic confirmations to date are intrinsically bright and, therefore, not necessarily representative of the general population. Here, we report the unequivocal spectroscopic detection of a low luminosity galaxy at z>7.5. We detected the Lyman- emission line at ~10504 {\AA} in two separate observations with MOSFIRE on the Keck I Telescope and independently with the Hubble Space Telescope's slit-less grism spectrograph, implying a source redshift of z=7.6400.001. The galaxy is gravitationally magnified by the massive galaxy cluster MACS J1423.8+2404 (z=0.545), with an estimated intrinsic luminosity of M_AB=-19.60.2 mag and a stellar mass of M_{\star} = 3.0^{+1.5}_{-0.8} x 10^8 solar masses. Both are an order of magnitude lower than the four other Lyman- emitters currently known at z>7.5, making it probably the most distant representative source of reionization found to date.

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