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NGC 2841
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NGC 2841 (also Arp 285, IRAS 09206+4925, MCG 8-17-92, UGC 4995 and PGC 26512) is a magnitude +13.0 spiral galaxy located 127 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major.
In the sky it can be found roughly 20' southeast of the magnitude +6.1 star 37 Ursa Major, and 5' west of HD 80566.

The galaxy was discovered by German-British astronomer William Herschel using a 47.5 cm (18.7 inch) f/13 speculum reflector at Windsor Road, Slough, on the 9th March 1788.

Right Ascension   09h 22m 02.3s, Declination +50° 58' 35"



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Flocculent Spiral NGC 2841



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Flocculent spiral NGC 2841

The galaxy NGC 2841 - shown here in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, taken with the space observatory's newest instrument, the Wide Field Camera 3 - currently has a relatively low star formation rate compared to other spirals. It is one of several nearby galaxies that have been specifically chosen for a new study in which a pick 'n' mix of different stellar nursery environments and birth rates are being observed.
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The magnitude 9.3 spiral galaxy is estimated to be 130,000 light years across and around 39 million light years away, (Cepheid data indicate a distance of 12 ±1 Mpc).
NGC 2841 is located in the southwestern Ursa Major, about 2 degrees southwest of 3.1 magnitude Theta Ursae Majoris.



NGC 2841 has hosted three past supernovae; 1912A, 1957A and 1972R.
NGC 2841 is thought to have had an encounter with a gas rich galaxy several billion years ago. Gas was accreted from the smaller galaxy and was drawn into the nucleus where it established an independent rotation, perpendicular to the inner disk. Star formation then occurred from the captured gas producing a secondary chemically decoupled stellar population. The nucleus is substantially different in its chemical abundances from the inner bulge.

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NGC 2841
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This X-ray/optical composite image of the large spiral galaxy NGC 2841 in the constellation Ursa Major shows multimillion-degree gas (blue/X-ray) rising above the disk of stars and cooler gas (grey/optical).


Expand (223kb, 568 x 792)
Position(2000): RA 09h 22m 02.60s Dec +50º 58' 35.50"
Size 5.75 arcmin across

The rapid outflows of gas from giant stars, and supernova explosions in the disk of a galaxy create huge shells or bubbles of hot gas that expand rapidly and rise above the disk like plumes of smoke from a chimney. This Chandra Xray telescope image of NGC 2841 provides direct evidence for this process, which pumps energy into the thin gaseous halo that surrounds the galaxy. Galactic chimneys also spread hot, metal enriched gas away from the disk of the galaxy into the halo.

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