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Post Info TOPIC: The Meteor of July 27, 1894


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Title: Section VII - Reports on the meteor of July 27, 1894.
Journal: Contributions of Lick Observatory, vol. 5, pp.24-29

Section II contains abstracts of some of the reports on the meteor, particularly of those which are useful in fixing the orbit. The present section is devoted to all the reports received at the Observatory. They are arranged alphabetically by towns.

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THE METEOR OF JULY 27, 1894, 7h 30m P. S. T.
By Edward S. Holden

A great number of observations of this splendid meteor were received at the Lick Observatory, either directly, or through the kind offices of Hon. A. S. Towne, Hon. C. F. Crocker, Hon. R. Thompson and others. Some of the best were not available till the middle of October. Very complete observations of the meteor's position and appearance were made at Mount Hamilton by seven observers. Professor Aitken of the University of the Pacific sent the only complete observation received here, viz. , the altitude and azimuth of the meteor when it exploded, and the same co-ordinates of the point where it disappeared. Many good determinations of the point of explosion were received, the best being those of Professor Friend (Carson), Mr. Carleton and Mr. Burckhalter (Chabot Observatory), Mr. George Bray (Santa Clara), Mr. W. B. Johnson and Mr. Stoneroad (Merced), Mr. Herrold and Mr. Herring (San Jos6). Drawings of the brilliant cloud left by the explosion were received from Professor Schaeberle (Mount Hamilton), Mr. Johnson (Merced), Mr. Stewart (Visalia); and excellent accounts of this cloud from Dr. O'Brien (Merced) and others. A beautiful and artistic water-color drawing of the phenomenon has been presented to the Observatory by Mr. Chauncey M. St. John, which represents the general appearance in a most satisfactory way. The determinations of the place where the meteor disappeared were not so satisfactory, the reasons being, no doubt, that everyone's attention was riveted on the cloud left by the explosion, and because the meteor divided into two portions near the end of its course.

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