* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: Gobekli Tepe


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Gobekli Tepe
Permalink  
 


10000 BC, Göbekli Tepe

Spoiler



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Göbekli Tepe
Permalink  
 


World's oldest temple built to worship the dog star

THE world's oldest temple, Göbekli Tepe in southern Turkey, may have been built to worship the dog star, Sirius.
The 11,000-year-old site consists of a series of at least 20 circular enclosures, although only a few have been uncovered since excavations began in the mid-1990s. Each one is surrounded by a ring of huge, T-shaped stone pillars, some of which are decorated with carvings of fierce animals.



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Gobekli Tepe
Permalink  
 


Temple May Have Been Cosmopolitan Centre

Ancient blades made of volcanic rock that were discovered at what may be the world's oldest temple suggest that the site in Turkey was the hub of a pilgrimage that attracted a cosmopolitan group of people some 11,000 years ago.
The researchers matched up about 130 of the blades, which would have been used as tools, with their source volcanoes, finding people would have come from far and wide to congregate at the ancient temple site, Göbekli Tepe, in southern Turkey. The blades are made of obsidian, a volcanic glass rich with silica, which forms when lava cools quickly.

Read more



__________________
Anonymous

Date:
Permalink  
 

When I looked at Gobekli Tepe the first thing that I noticed was the 13 pillars with images of animals, reminding me of the 13 ancient zodiac.  The 13th zodiac symbol being Ophiuchus/serpent bearer. At Gobekli there is the scorpion, lion, serpent, & i believe a bull also. The ancient 4 cardinal directions are Scorpio/scorpion or bird, Leo/lion, Aquarius/man, Taurus/bull.

 

Spoiler



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Some 5,200 years ago, in the mountains of western Iran, people may have used takeout windows to get food and weapons, newly presented research suggests.
But rather than the greasy hamburgers and fries, it appears the inhabitants of the site ordered up goat, grain and even bullets, among other items.
The find was made at Godin Tepe, an archaeological site in the valley of Kangavar in Kermanshah Province. The site was excavated in the 1960s and 1970s by a team led by T. Cuyler Young Jr., a curator at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, Canada, who died in 2006.
A team of researchers took up his work after he died and recently published the results of the excavation, along with more recent research on the artifacts, in the book "On the High Road: The History of Godin Tepe."

Read more



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

gopekli_tepe.jpg
Source

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Danielle Stordeur, an archaeologist at the National Centre for Scientific Research in France, emphasises the significance of the vulture carvings. Some cultures have long believed the high-flying carrion birds transported the flesh of the dead up to the heavens. Stordeur has found similar symbols at sites from the same era as Gobekli Tepe just 50 miles away in Syria.
For his part, Schmidt is certain the secret is right beneath his feet. Over the years, his team has found fragments of human bone in the layers of dirt that filled the complex. Deep test pits have shown that the floors of the rings are made of hardened limestone. Schmidt is betting that beneath the floors he'll find the structures' true purpose: a final resting place for a society of hunters.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Spoiler


Spoiler


Spoiler


Göbekli Tepe is the oldest temple on Earth, over 12000 years old.



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Göbekli Tepe
Permalink  
 


A 12,000-year-old temple dating from the Neolithic Age has been discovered in the southeastern province of Sanlurfa in what scientists are declaring the oldest place of worship ever discovered.
In 1986, a local man known as Uncle Savah discovered a statuette in his small field in Göbeklitepe while tilling the soil. He took the figurine to the Sanlurfa Archaeology Museum where experts determined that it was created between 6000 and 7000 B.C.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Gobekli Tepe
Permalink  
 


Human history is being rewritten in the hills of southern Turkey.
The astonishing story it tells not only sheds light on how civilisation evolved, but also sounds a warning.
Fifteen years ago a Kurdish shepherd was grazing his sheep across a well-known local landmark - a mound that rose slowly from the otherwise almost featureless plain.

Read more

__________________
1 2  >  Last»  | Page of 2  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard