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Falkor Research Vessel Maps Worlds Largest Volcano

A research team with the Schmidt Ocean Institute has just finished mapping the worlds largest undersea volcano.
Tamu Massif is an undersea volcano off the coast of Guam which lies 6,500 feet below the surface. For perspective- its about the size of New Mexico.

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Tamu Plateau
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World's Largest Volcano Officially Named For Texas A&M

The world's largest volcano - all 120,000 square miles of it - is now officially named for Texas A&M University and is called Tamu Plateau, the U.S. Board of Geographic Names (BGN) has announced.
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Shatsky Rise Supervolcano
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Title: The Shatsky Rise Supervolcano and the Formation of Oceanic Plateaus
Authors: William W. Sager , Takashi Sano , Jun Korenaga , William W. Sager

Oceanic plateaus are igneous mountains constructed by massive eruptions of basalt and related igneous rocks. Because they are hidden beneath remote parts of the oceans, the structure and evolution of these mountains are poorly known. Shatsky Rise, in the northwest Pacific, is an oceanic plateau that formed ~145-125 Ma near a triple junction. It consists of three large volcanic massifs and a narrow volcanic ridge. Eruptions apparently began with the largest volcanic edifice (Tamu Massif) and waned through time with the formation of two other massifs. The discrete volcanic centers of Shatsky Rise likely resulted from relatively rapid drift of the Pacific plate relative to the melting anomaly. Tamu Massif is a supervolcano, i.e., a huge volcanic edifice with a volcanic center, like a seamount, but much bigger. Its area is similar to Olympus Mons on Mars, the largest volcano in the solar system. Geophysical data show that Tamu Massif has a shape that is symmetric across its axis. A seismic profile across the axis shows that lava flows flowed outward from its center. Seismic profiles in some spots over the axis show normal faulting that implies a volcanic rift zone, which is consistent with it being the major source of lava flows. Flank slopes are low, implying long, low viscosity lava flows. Coring on Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 324 recovered basalt flows of two types: pillows and massive flows. Pillows are indicative of normal seamount volcanism at low effusion rates whereas the massive flows imply high volume lava flows with high effusion rates. Massive flows are typical of continental flood basalts and are also found on other large plateaus. On Shatsky Rise, thick massive flows are found on Tamu Massif, whereas pillows and thin massive flows characterise the other massifs. This trend supports the idea that Tamu Massif was formed by an initial massive eruptive event and afterwards volcanism waned as other massifs were erupted. Shallow water fossils and depth-diagnostic rocks and sediments indicate that the summits of Shatsky Rise massifs were near sea level at the time of formation. In this regard Shatsky Rise appears in between Kerguelen Plateau, which erupted mostly subaerially, and Ontong Java Plateau, which erupted mostly well below sea level. In sum, the structure and evolution of Tamu Massif appears much like that of a typical seamount, except that it is much bigger and was built by correspondingly larger and widespread eruptions. It similarities to Ontong Java Plateau imply analogous eruptive processes. Indeed, large oceanic plateaus may be made up of supervolcanoes like Tamu Massif with overall plateau morephology dictated by interplay of the rate of volcanism and the rate of plate drift over the melting anomaly.

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Scientists Confirm Existence of Largest Single Volcano on Earth

A University of Houston (UH) professor led a team of scientists to uncover the largest single volcano yet documented on Earth. Covering an area roughly equivalent to the British Isles or the state of New Mexico, this volcano, dubbed the Tamu Massif, is nearly as big as the giant volcanoes of Mars, placing it among the largest in the Solar System. Sager - Tamu Masif
William Sager, a professor in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at UH, first began studying the volcano about 20 years ago at Texas A&M's College of Geosciences. Sager and his team's findings appear in the Sept. 8 issue of Nature Geoscience, the monthly multi-disciplinary journal reflecting disciplines within the geosciences.

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The Tamu Massif is the largest volcano on Earth, formed 130 to 145 million years ago. It is inactive, and located on the seafloor of the Pacific Ocean in the Shatsky Rise about 1,000 miles east of Japan.
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Underwater volcano is Earth's biggest

Geophysicists have discovered what they say is the largest single volcano on Earth, a 650-kilometre-wide beast the size of the British Isles lurking beneath the waters of the northwest Pacific Ocean.
The megavolcano has been inactive for some 140 million years. But its very existence will help geophysicists to set limits on how much magma can be stored in Earth's crust and pour out onto the surface. It also shows that Earth can produce volcanoes on par with Olympus Mons on Mars, which, at 625 kilometres across, was until now the biggest volcano known in the Solar System.

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