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RE: Delta-Cancrid meteors
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Another possible parent for the Delta Cancrids is Comet Dunlop, seen only in 1833. This is suspected of being a short-period object (P = 3.5 years), in which case the 1833 return must have been a large outburst folloowed by a fatal fading. If the SP orbit is correct, the D' criterion for Maribo meteorite is just 0.07 and for the "average" Delta Can orbit, alsoD' = 0.07. The CRE age of Maribo is 600,000 - 1200,000 years. If that is the time sinceit split from the parent, perhaps Dunlop is a long-period comet after all and that Maribo and 1990 AQ split from it in a disruption several returns past (on an orbit of several tens or hundreds of thouands of years). There may be other active fragments still in the Dunlop orbit (a comet group) all contributing to the present Delta Can shower!



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According to Drummond's D' criterion, the Delta-Cancrid's appear to be associated with asteroid 1991 AQ and also with the Maribo meteorite. (D' values less than 0.105 imply association).

Maribo meteorite/1991 AQ, D' = 0.04

1991 AQ/average Delta Cancrid orbit (from Kronk), D' = 0.0821

Maribo meteorite/average Delta Cancrid orbit, D = 0.0717

That seems to be the strongest association between any known meteorite and meteor shower!



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The Delta-Cancrid meteor shower will peak on January 17th, 2013.



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Delta-Cancrid meteor shower
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This shower exhibits a typically long duration that is a major characteristic of ecliptic streams--extending from December 14 to February 14. Maximum occurs around January 17 (=297.3) from an average radiant of RA=128, DECL=+20.
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Delta Cancrids
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The Delta Cancrids are a medium strength meteor shower lasting from December 14 to February 14, the main shower from January 1 to January 24. The radiant is located in the constellation of Cancer, near Delta Cancri. It peaks on January 17 each year, with only four meteors per hour. It was first discovered in 1872, but the first solid evidence of this phenomenon came in 1971. The source of this meteor shower is unknown, it has been suggested that it is similar to the orbit of asteroid 2001 YB5.

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Delta-Cancrid meteors
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The Delta-Cancrid meteor shower will peak on January 17th, 2006.
January's Full Moon occurred on January 14, and will interfere with the sparse shower (ZHR=4).
The Delta Cancrids rise in the east about the same time the sun sets in the west...thus the constellation of Cancer is nearly directly overhead at midnight. The shower radiant is just slightly west of the bright naked eye star cluster, Prasepe or the "beehive."

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