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Post Info TOPIC: NGC 6362


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RE: NGC 6362
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Title: RR Lyrae stars in NGC 6362
Author: R. Smolec, P. Moskalik, J. Kaluzny, W. Pych, M. Rozyczka, I.B. Thompson

We present the analysis of the top-quality photometry of RR Lyrae stars in the globular cluster NGC 6362, gathered over 11 observing seasons by the CASE project. 16 stars are fundamental mode pulsators (RRab stars) and 16 are first overtone pulsators (RRc stars). In two stars, previously identified as RRab, V3 and V34, we detect additional periodicity identified as radial first overtone mode. Lower than usual period ratios (0.730 and 0.728), dominant pulsation in the radial fundamental mode and presence of a long-period modulation indicate, that these two variables are not classical RRd stars, but are new members of the recently identified class of anomalous RRd variables. In a significant fraction of RRc stars, 63 per cent, we detect additional shorter-period variability in the (0.60, 0.65)P1 range. This form of double-periodic pulsation must be common in first overtone RR Lyr stars, as space observations indicate. The incidence rate we find in NGC 6362, is the highest in ground-based observations reported so far. We study the properties of these stars in detail; in particular we confirm that in the colour-magnitude diagram, this group is adjacent to the interface between RRab and RRc stars, as first reported in the analysis of M3 observations by Jurcsik et al. The incidence rate of the Blazhko effect is also very high: we observe it in 69 per cent of RRab stars and in 19 per cent of RRc stars. Rare, double-periodic modulation is reported in one RRab and in one RRc star. Finally we discuss V37 - a peculiar variable in which we detect two close high-amplitude periodicities and modulation. Its previous classification as RRc must be treated as tentative.

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GCl 66
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NGC 6362 (also ESO 102-SC8 and GCl 66) is a magnitude +8.3 globular star cluster located 24,800 light-years away in the constellation Ara.

The cluster was discovered by Scottish astronomer James Dunlop using a homemade 9-foot 22.86 cm (9 inch) f/12 speculum Newtonian reflector at Paramatta, New South Wales, Australia, on the 25th June 1826.

Right Ascension 17h 31m 54.99s, Declination -67 02' 54"

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RE: NGC 6362
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British astronomer James Dunlop first observed the globular cluster NGC 6362 in the constellation Ara, on 30 June 1826.
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Hubble Sees an Unexpected Population of Young-Looking Stars

703723main1_ngc6362-673.JPG

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope offers an impressive view of the center of globular cluster NGC 6362. The image of this spherical collection of stars takes a deeper look at the core of the globular cluster, which contains a high concentration of stars with different colours.
Tightly bound by gravity, globular clusters are composed of old stars, which, at around 10 billion years old, are much older than the sun. These clusters are fairly common, with more than 150 currently known in our galaxy, the Milky Way, and more which have been spotted in other galaxies.

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Stars Ancient and Modern?

eso1243a.jpg

This colourful view of the globular star cluster NGC 6362 was captured by the Wide Field Imager attached to the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile. This new picture, along with a new image of the central region from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, provide the best view of this little-known cluster ever obtained. Globular clusters are mainly composed of tens of thousands of very ancient stars, but they also contain some stars that look suspiciously young.
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