* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: Sudbury Neutrino Observatory


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
CF3I Bubble Chamber
Permalink  
 


Title: First Dark Matter Search Results from a 4-kg CF3I Bubble Chamber Operated in a Deep Underground Site
Authors: E. Behnke, J. Behnke, S.J. Brice, D. Broemmelsiek, J.I. Collar, A. Conner, P.S. Cooper, M. Crisler, C.E. Dahl, D. Fustin, E. Grace, J. Hall, M. Hu, I. Levine, W. H. Lippincott, T. Moan, T. Nania, E. Ramberg, A.E. Robinson, A. Sonnenschein, M. Szydagis, E. Vázquez-Jáuregui

New data are reported from the operation of a 4.0 kg CF3I bubble chamber in the 6800 foot deep SNOLAB underground laboratory. The effectiveness of ultrasound analysis in discriminating alpha decay background events from single nuclear recoils has been confirmed, with a lower bound of >99.3% rejection of alpha decay events. Twenty single nuclear recoil event candidates and three multiple bubble events were observed during a total exposure of 553 kg-days distributed over three different bubble nucleation thresholds. The effective exposure for single bubble recoil-like events was 437.4 kg-days. A neutron background internal to the apparatus, of known origin, is estimated to account for five single nuclear recoil events and is consistent with the observed rate of multiple bubble events. This observation provides world best direct detection constraints on WIMP-proton spin-dependent scattering for WIMP masses >20 GeV/c² and demonstrates significant sensitivity for spin-independent interactions.

Read more (220kb, PDF)



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Sudbury Neutrino Observatory
Permalink  
 


Two Queen's researchers have received $10.5 million to hunt for the dark matter particles that are believed to be the building blocks of the universe.
Physicists Mark Boulay and Mark Chen received the money from the Canadian Foundation for Innovation and will perform their research at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
PICASSO project
Permalink  
 


A Canadian, American, and Czech team of astronomers has achieved a higher separation of WIMP interactions from other interactions in a dark matter detector that previously achieved. This resulted during calibration runs of new modules used in the PICASSO project at SNOLAB in Canada. The effect is not completely understood, and further understanding, along with system adjustments, can aid in further suppressing background interactions when searching for dark matter.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Sudbury Neutrino Observatory
Permalink  
 


Researchers at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory say they have developed a new technique in the search for dark matter, the invisible substance or group of substances that make up a large percentage of the universe.
The Picasso group, made up of researchers from Canada, the United States and Czech Republic, said the new method will clear out background noise from other particles to give detectors a better shot at finding dark matter signals.

Read more

__________________
Anonymous

Date:
Permalink  
 

Sudbury Neutrino Observatory
A $10-million expansion to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) research facilities involving Queen's and five other Canadian universities is officially open for business.

The SNOLAB Surface Research Centre will provide a state-of-the-art working environment for researchers, setting the stage for innovative experiments to answer fundamental questions behind the origin of the universe and the nature of matter. Administered by Carleton University, the SNOLAB collaboration includes Queen's, Laurentian, UBC, the University of Guelph, the Université de Montréal, and a number of international partners.


Founding director of the SNO Institute Art McDonald with Queen's Associate Vice-Principal (Research) Sandra Crocker and head of the Physics Department David Hanes at opening of new SNOLAB facilities in Sudbury.

"We are very pleased to build on the successful measurements by the SNO experiment through future experiments in SNOLAB that will probe further fundamental properties of our universe. Our students and staff are preparing a new generation of experiments to look for the dark matter known to make up 25 per cent of our universe, and to study further properties of neutrinos, including measurements that can help us understand the formation of matter shortly after the Big Bang. With SNOLAB, we have the best location in the world for these measurements and can provide wonderful opportunities for our students at the frontiers of physics and astrophysics" - Professor Art McDonald, Queen's Physics, founding director of the SNO Institute and 2003 winner of Canada's top scientist award, the Herzberg Gold Medal.

The discovery by the Queen's-led SNO team in 2001 that solar neutrinos -- tiny subatomic particles produced in the core of the Sun and considered the basic building blocks of the universe -- change into other neutrino types en route to Earth was ranked the second most important scientific breakthrough in the world by the international journal Science. Today, SNOLAB researchers continue to search for previously undetected components of the dark matter thought to make up about one-quarter of the universe, as well as new properties of neutrinos.

Other Queen's researchers involved with SNOLAB include current SNO Institute director Tony Noble and Mark Boulay, both Canada Research Chairs in Particle Astrophysics, and Physics Professors Aksel Hallin and Mark Chen.

Funding for the SNOLAB expansion comes from the Ontario Innovation Trust ($4,821,118), Northern Ontario Heritage Fund ($4,500,000) and the Canada Foundation for Innovation ($605,171) which also contributed close to $39M for a new underground facility. FedNor, INCO, and the Greater City of Sudbury have also provided support for the project.
The next phase of the project, scheduled for 2007, is an underground lab to be constructed two kilometres underground in INCO's Creighton Mine. It will feature the largest laboratory in the world located that far beneath the earth's surface.

__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard