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Title: Expansion measurement of Supernova Remnant RX J1713.7-3946.
Author: Naomi Tsuji, Yasunobu Uchiyama (Rikkyo University)

Supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7-3946 is well known for its bright TeV gamma-ray emission with shell-like morphology. To constrain the hydrodynamical evolution, we have performed six times observations of the northwestern (NW) shell with the Chandra X-ray Observatory from 2005 to 2011, and measured the proper motion by using these data and the first epoch observation taken in 2000. The blast-wave shock speed at the NW shell is measured to be (3900300)(d/kpc) km s^-1 with an estimated distance of d=1 kpc, and the proper motions of other structures within the NW shell are significantly less than that. Assuming that the measured blast-wave shock speed is the representative of the remnant's outer shock wave as a whole, we have confronted our measurements as well as a recent detection of thermal X-ray lines, with the analytic solution of the hydrodynamical properties of SNRs. Our hydrodynamical analysis indicates that the age of the remnant is 1580-2100 years, supporting the association with SN393. A model with SN kinetic energy of E=10^51erg, the ejecta mass of Mej=3 solar masses, and the ambient density at the current blast wave location of n2=0.015cm^-3, provides reasonable explanation for our measurements and previous findings at the X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. We find that the transition to the Sedov-Taylor (ST) phase is incomplete for any reasonable set of parameters, implying that the current maximum energy of accelerated protons in RX J1713.7-3946 would not correspond to the maximum attainable energy for this remnant.

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Title: Cosmic Ray Electron Evolution in the Supernova Remnant RX J1713.7-3946
Authors: Justin D. Finke, Charles D. Dermer

A simple formalism to describe nonthermal electron acceleration, evolution, and radiation in supernova remnants (SNRs) is presented. The electron continuity equation is analytically solved assuming that the nonthermal electron injection power is proportional to the rate at which the kinetic energy of matter swept up in an adiabatically expanding SNR shell. We apply this model to fermi and HESS data from the SNR
xj, and find that a one-zone leptonic model with Compton-scattered cosmic microwave background (CMB) and interstellar infrared photons has difficulty providing a good fit to its spectral energy distribution, provided the source is at a distance ~ 1 kpc from the Earth. However, the inclusion of multiple zones, as hinted at by recent Chandra observations, does provide a good fit, but requires a second zone of compact knots with magnetic fields B~ 16 mu G, comparable to shock-compressed fields found in the bulk of the remnant.

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Title: 3 to 12 millimetre studies of dense gas towards the western rim of supernova remnant RX J1713.7-3946
Authors: Nigel I. Maxted, Gavin P. Rowell, Bruce R. Dawson, Michael G. Burton, Brent P. Nicholas, Yasuo Fukui, Andrew J. Walsh, Akiko Kawamura, Hirotaka Horachi, Hidetoshi Sano

The young X-ray and gamma-ray-bright supernova remnant RXJ1713.7-3946 (SNR G347.3-0.5) is believed to be associated with molecular cores that lie within regions of the most intense TeV emission. Using the Mopra telescope, four of the densest cores were observed using high-critical density tracers such as CS(J=1-0,J=2-1) and its isotopologue counterparts, NH3(1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions and N2H+(J=1-0) emission, confirming the presence of dense gas >10^4cm^-3 in the region. The mass estimates for Core C range from 40 stellar masses (from CS(J=1-0)) to 80 stellar masses (from NH3 and N2H+), an order of magnitude smaller than published mass estimates from CO(J=1-0) observations. We also modelled the energy-dependent diffusion of cosmic-ray protons accelerated by RXJ1713.7-3946 into Core C, approximating the core with average density and magnetic field values. We find that for considerably suppressed diffusion coefficients (factors \chi=10^{-3} down to 10^{-5} the galactic average), low energy cosmic-rays can be prevented from entering the inner core region. Such an effect could lead to characteristic spectral behaviour in the GeV to TeV gamma-ray and multi-keV X-ray fluxes across the core. These features may be measurable with future gamma-ray and multi-keV telescopes offering arcminute or better angular resolution, and can be a novel way to understand the level of cosmic-ray acceleration in RXJ1713.7-3946 and the transport properties of cosmic-rays in the dense molecular cores.

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