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RE: Copernicus crater
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Copernicus crater captured with a 100mm f5 Helios refractor and vesta pro webcam. Motorised EQ1 Mount. 2x skywatcher Barlow lens.

Capture 2015-04-28T21_42_05 


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Copernicus crater captured with a 8" reflector and vesta pro webcam. 1.5x Barlow lens, Motorised EQ5 Mount.

Capture 2015-02-01T20_34_05 

Clear(ish) sky between snow flurries. Moderate seeing.



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Copernicus is located in eastern Oceanus Procellarum and is visible using 10 x 50 binoculars.

Capture 17_07_2014 02_17_06

Image captured with a 100mm refractor and webcam.



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LROC Images Copernicus Central Peak

7-5-12_copernicus-150x150.jpg

LROC imaged the interior of Copernicus crater pictured above; the central peaks immediately capture your eye, with the tallest peak rising one kilometre above the floor of the crater. For comparison, the Grand Canyon has an average depth of 1.6 km. During the impact that formed Copernicus crater, an unimaginable amount of kinetic energy was transferred instantaneously into the surface. After the excavation stage of the impact, the initial transient crater collapsed under the force of gravity causing the crater rim to move inward, and the central region rebounded (uplifts) to form the central peaks
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 Iconic Lunar Orbiter Image of Copernicus Re-released

An iconic image from the initial exploration of the Moon was re-released showing detail that could not have been seen using technology available at the time the photo was taken. This image features a dramatic view inside the majestic crater Copernicus - a view that left millions in awe when it was first released.
Between 1966 and 1967 NASA sent five Lunar Orbiter spacecraft to the Moon. Their job was to survey the surface to help determine landing sites for the upcoming Apollo missions. In addition to their recon role, these spacecraft also significantly contributed to our scientific understanding of the Moon. They also captured photos of this nearby world that human eyes had never seen before.

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LROC Wide Angle Camera (WAC) visible to ultraviolet portrait of Copernicus crater

PIA13964.jpg

Understanding how scientists determine the relative age of geologic units on the Moon is straightforward, most of the time. One simply follows the law of superposition; what is on top is younger, what is below is older. In some cases, superposition relations are not clear, so scientists then compare crater densities. That is the number of impact craters on a common size of ground. Since impacts occur randomly both in time and on the Moon's surface, any piece of ground has an equal chance of being hit. Over time, the number craters in a given area increases. Simply stated, the older an area the more craters you will find.

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Spoiler

Copernicus crater and Mare Insularum captured with a 100mm refractor and Vesta pro webcam. Baader contrast filter + IR-cut filter. + Test Barlow lens



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Spoiler

Copernicus crater and Mare Insularum captured with a 100mm refractor and Vesta pro webcam. Baader contrast filter + IR-cut filter. 2x Barlow lens



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Copernicus crater 15_01_2012 06_09_49.

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The moon captured with a 100mm refractor and Vista pro webcam.
Light Yellow filter + IR-cut filter

 

Copernicus is a prominent lunar impact crater named after the astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus, located in eastern Oceanus Procellarum. It is estimated to be about 800 million years old, and typifies craters that formed during the Copernican period in that it has a prominent ray system.
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