* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: February Eta Draconids


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: February Eta Draconids
Permalink  
 


New meteor shower points to a future close encounter

A pair of astronomers monitoring an all-sky camera got a surprise when they checked data from last February: a half dozen meteors all seemed to come from the same spot in the sky, indicating they all had a common origin. After doing some calculations, they found that they probably come from a parent comet with an orbit that's at least 53 years long. Moreover, the orbit of this comet crosses that of the Earth, meaning we may have a close encounter with this object sometime in the future.
Read more



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Unseen comet's orbit indicates possible crash

A stream of dusty fragments from a comet born in the outermost reaches of the solar system has hit the Earth on a path that leads astronomers to conclude the comet itself could be "potentially hazardous" if it crashes into the planet.
Read more



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

P. Jenniskens, SETI Institute, reports the detection of a meteor outburst from a previously unknown shower on 2011 February 4 during routine low-light-level video triangulations with NASA's Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS) project in California between 2h20m and 14h20m UT.
During that time interval, six meteors radiated from a compact geocentric radiant at R.A. = 239.92 0.50 deg, Decl. = +62.49 0.22 deg, with velocity V_g = 35.58 0.34 km/s. The times of arrival for the meteors were 6h25m, 7h59m, 10h49m, 11h18m, 12h14m, and 13h33m UT, suggesting that the outburst peaked around 11h UT (solar longitude 315.1 deg) and had a duration of at least 7 hours.

Read more



__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard