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Post Info TOPIC: October 2010


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RE: October 2010
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The clocks go back one hour at 1.00 am GMT (2.00 am BST) on the 31st October, 2010, ( Sunday) as civil time changes from British Summer Time (BST) to Coordinated Universal Time.

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Early morning autumn skies are bringing fantastic celestial displays from the heavens with this year's annual Orionid meteor showers.
These annual showers can be see anytime between October 17th and 25th with this year's peak expected early Thursday morning.

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At the beginning of October you can just pick out bright Venus setting in the southwest just after the sunset. As October progresses Venus will disappear from the evening sky but by the end of the month Venus will reappear rising minutes before the sun as Lucifer, the morning star. Yes, Lucifer meaning the light-bearer, is the name sometimes given to Venus as the morning star. Lucifer rising the morning of Halloween sounds appropriate.
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Asteroids


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You've probably already noticed it, you can't miss it rising in the east-southeast after sunset. Jupiter is by far the largest planet in our solar system. At over 88,000 miles in diameter, you could fit 11 Earths across its equator. Jupiter has 63 known moons, four of which are easily visible through a small telescope. Imagine what nighttime on Earth would be like if we had 63 moons. With the aid of a small telescope you can observe the four largest moons (Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto), just as Galileo did 400 years ago.
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Asteroids

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Jupiter and Uranus are still buddies in binoculars. How many of Jupiter's four bright moons can you see tonight? The view shows the moons' position around 9 p.m. CDT. I=Io, II=Europa, III=Ganymede and IV= Callisto.
Last night was the start of my fall community ed class on astronomy. We kept our eyes peeled for Draconid meteors early in the evening and spotted at least two of them spouting from the head of the dragon. I wondered if any would show, so it was a small thrill just to see these. Jupiter was the hit of the night with three moons in view and one big dark stripe, the North Equatorial Cloud Belt.

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October Camelopardalis meteor shower
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Around the 5th October a few years ago, an amateur astronomer J. Moilanen detected a new meteor shower which originate from a hitherto unknown comet.
The comet is believed to have an orbit period of about 4,000 year. But what is worrying is that its orbit brings it to just inside the Earth's orbit; this makes it a potentially dangerous long-period comet.

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RE: October 2010
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1464141240_621e50e826_o.gif
The Constellation of Ophiuchus
Next to Hercules and standing on Scorpius, you will find the large constellation of Ophiuchus. The brightest star of Ophiuchus is Rasalhague, which means Head of the Snake Charmer and is only a magnitude 2. You can see this constellation, which looks a bit like a misshapen triangle under less than ideal conditions.
Ophiuchus, the Serpent Bearer, was formerly known as Serpentarius. In mythology, it is associated with the healer Aesculapius, who became so skilled that he was able to bring the dead back to life. To avoid depopulation of the underworld, Jupiter disposed of Aesculapius with a thunderbolt, but relented sufficiently to place him in the sky.
Ophiuchus contains seven Messier objects M9, M10, M12, M14, M19, M62 and M107 - which are all globular clusters of stars. At right ascension 18 hours 28 m, declination 6 degrees 30 m (the upper left hand corner of the constellation) there is an open cluster of stars that is labeled NGC6633. From a catalogue compiled in 1888, called the "New General Catalogue" . An open cluster consists of a large number of stars, although not as dense as a globular cluster.
M9 (NGC 6333) is the smallest of this group, unresolved except in large instruments. The cluster is found 3.5 SE of eta Ophiuchi. It is considered to be about 26,000 light years away. In the same field are two more globular clusters: NGC 6342 (1 SE) and NGC 6356 (1 NE).
M10 (NGC 6254) and M12 (NGC 6218) are nearly identical globular clusters: like tiny explosions of stars with dense cores. M12 is eight degrees north of zeta Ophiuchi and two degrees east. M10 is 2.5 degrees SE of M12, with 30 Ophiuchi in the same field.
M14 (NGC 6402) needs a 20-cm telescope to resolve; it's more condensed than the preceding two and slightly fainter.
M19 (NGC 6273) is another very dense cluster, usually described as "oblate", or egg-shaped. It is about 25000 light years away. M19 is seven degrees due east of Antares in Scorpius, or two and a half degrees west of the bright double 36
Ophiuchi (and very slightly north, less than a degree).
M62 (NGC 6266) is six degrees SW of theta Oph (and four degrees south of M19); this is another non-circular globular cluster, a little brighter than M19. (Note: Burnham includes this Messier in Scorpius; nearly all other authorities put it in Ophiuchus.)
M107 (NGC 6171) is the faintest of the bunch and quite small. This is one of those "Messiers" that were added to the original list, for some reason. It's three degrees SSW of zeta Ophiuchi.
B78, the "Pipe Nebula", is a naked eye dark nebula 2 southeast of theta Ophiuchi, in very rich area of the Milky Way.
Barnard's Star is the most rapidly moving star relative to the solar system, and the second closest star to us, at a distance of only 5.91 light years. This is a red dwarf, with a visual magnitude of only 9.5, and consequently not easily found. The star is three degrees due east of beta Ophiuchus. A slight oscillation in both the right ascension and declination of Barnard's Star has led observers to suggest the possibility that one or more planets orbit the star.
In the upper-left, less than 2 degrees north- east of Beta, is IC-4665, a beautiful open cluster that can be seen very well with ordinary binoculars.

The Pleiades
New to the sky in late evening youll see the wonderful gem of an open cluster rising in the East. As Tennyson said "The Pleiads , rising thro' the mellow shade, Glitter like a swarm of fireflies Tangled in a silver braid...".
Nearly every culture mentions the Pleiades in some respect. Chinese writings appear to mention it from 2357 BC. American Indian folklore of the Kiowa talks of the "Seven Maidens" who where protected from giant bears by their placement in the skies. To the Japanese, they are called Subaru.

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Egypt will witness the annual celebration of the perpendicular sun fall on the face of Pharaoh Ramses II statue in Abu Simbel Temple in Luxor on October 22.

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