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Title: Retired A Stars and Their Companions V. A hot Jupiter orbiting the 1.7 Msun Subgiant HD102956
Authors: John Asher Johnson, Brendan P. Bowler, Andrew W. Howard, Gregory W. Henry, Geoffrey W. Marcy, Howard Isaacson, John Michael Brewer, Debra A. Fischer, Timothy D. Morton, Justin R. Crepp

We report the detection of a giant planet in a 6.4950 day orbit around the 1.7 Msun subgiant HD102956. The planet has a semimajor axis a = 0.081 AU and minimum mass Msini = 0.96 Mjup. HD102956 is the most massive star known to harbour a hot Jupiter, and its planet is only the third known to orbit within 0.6 AU of a star more massive than 1.5 Msun. Based on our sample of 137 subgiants with M* > 1.45 Msun we find that 0.5-2.3% of A-type stars harbour a close-in planet (a < 0.1 AU) with Msini > 1 Mjup, consistent with hot-Jupiter occurrence for Sun-like stars. Thus, the paucity of planets with 0.1 < a/AU < 1.0 around intermediate-mass stars may be an exaggerated version of the "period valley" that is characteristic of planets around Sun-like stars.

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Title: Retired A Stars and Their Companions VI. A Pair of Interacting Exoplanet Pairs Around the Subgiants 24 Sextanis and HD200964
Authors: John Asher Johnson, Matthew Payne, Andrew W. Howard, Kelsey I. Clubb, Eric B. Ford, Brendan P. Bowler, Gregory W. Henry, Debra A. Fischer, Geoffrey W. Marcy, John M. Brewer, Christian Schwab, Sabine Reffert, Thomas B. Lowe

We report radial velocity measurements of the G-type subgiants 24 Sextanis (=HD90043) and HD200964. Both are massive, evolved stars that exhibit periodic variations due to the presence of a pair of Jovian planets. Photometric monitoring with the T12 0.80m APT at Fairborn Observatory demonstrates both stars to be constant in brightness to <= 0.002 mag, thus strengthening the planetary interpretation of the radial velocity variations. 24 Sex b,c have orbital periods of 453.8 days and 883~days, corresponding to semimajor axes 1.333 AU and 2.08 AU, and minimum masses (Msini) 1.99 Mjup and 0.86 Mjup, assuming a stellar mass 1.54 Msun. HD200964 b,c have orbital periods of 613.8 days and 825 days, corresponding to semimajor axes 1.601 AU and 1.95 AU, and minimum masses 1.85 Mjup and 0.90 Mjup, assuming M* = 1.44 Msun. We also carry out dynamical simulations to properly account for gravitational interactions between the planets. Most, if not all, of the dynamically stable solutions include crossing orbits, suggesting that each system is locked in a mean motion resonance that prevents close encounters and provides long-term stability. The planets in the 24 Sex system likely have a period ratio near 2:1, while the HD200964 system is even more tightly packed with a period ratio close to 4:3. However, we caution that further radial velocity observations and more detailed dynamical modelling will be required to provide definitive and unique orbital solutions for both cases, and to determine whether the two systems are truly resonant.

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Hundreds of extrasolar planets have been found over the past decade and a half, most of them solitary worlds orbiting their parent star in seeming isolation. With further observation, however, one in three of these systems have been found to have two or more planets. Planets, it appears, come in bunches. Most of these systems contain planets that orbit too far from one another to feel each other's gravity. In just a handful of cases, planets have been found near enough to one another to interact gravitationally.
Now, however, John A. Johnson, an assistant professor of astronomy at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and his colleagues have found two systems with pairs of gas giant planets locked in an orbital embrace.

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