* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: June Lyrids meteor shower


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: June Lyrids meteor shower
Permalink  
 


June Lyrid meteor maximum at 14:00 UT, 16th June, 2014.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Start of the June Lyrids meteor shower in the constellation Lyra on the 10th June 2014


__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

June Lyrid meteor maximum at 08:00 UT, 16th June, 2013.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Title: On the Existence of the June Lyrid Meteor Shower
Authors: Kidger, M. R.

The possible existence of the June Lyrid meteor shower is examined from data in the IMO archive from 1984 to 1997. It is concluded that the activity is weak but detectable in most years. The mean activity curve shos a symmetrical rise and fall about a maximum of ZHR = 3, although annual variations are undoubtedly present. The solar longitude of the maximum has remained practically constant since the discovery of the stream in the late 1960s.

Read more



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: June Lyrid Meteor Shower
Permalink  
 


June Lyrids in the constellation Lyra

ZHR=3.1

Velocity=20.3km/s

The stream is active from the 11th to the 21st June

Radiant: RA=18.9h/282° Dec=43.8° (J2000)  



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

June Lyrids 2011



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
The June Lyrids
Permalink  
 


The June Lyrids are a low-rate shower with ~10 meteors per hour during its peak.
The meteors will appear to radiate from the constellation Lyra. 
Look to the North East around Midnight.

This meteor shower was discovered on the evening of June 15, 1966, by S. Dvorak (California, USA) while camping out in the San Bernardino mountains. His attention had been drawn to the region of Lyra by a very bright meteor that moved swiftly to the northeast through that constellation. Another meteor was noted a short time later and Dvorak began plotting additional meteors. After 1 1/2 hours he had managed to plot 16 meteors, of which 13 appeared to originate from a hitherto unknown radiant located at RA=278°, DECL=+30°. Just a few hours later, F. W. Talbot (Cheshire, England) independently discovered the radiant at RA=275.5°, DECL=+30°, and noted an hourly rate near 9.
Read more 
 
June 14, 2011 12:00 am    to    June 16, 2011 3:59 pm
Read more 



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
June Lyrids meteor shower
Permalink  
 


June Lyrids meteor shower (in constellation Lyra)

Best seen from  0.2h - 2.1h 
ZHR=2.4
Local hour rate=1 
Velocity=20.3km/s (very slow)
Radiant: RA=18.8h/281°  Dec=44.7° (J2000)

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
June Lyrid Meteor Shower
Permalink  
 


June Lyrid Meteor Shower
The June Lyrids are active during June 10 - 21, producing very slow (Velocity=20.3km/s) blue and white meteors at a maximum hourly rate of only 8 per hour on June 15 (Solar Longitude=85.2° deg).
The source for the Lyrid meteor shower is unknown.
At maximum the radiant is located at RA=19.8h/282°  Dec=43.8° in constellation Lyra which rises in the northeast.
The brightest star in Lyra, Vega, is the brightest star  in this part of the sky.
The average observed magnitude of this shower is near 3, while about a third of the meteors leave trains.
A last quarter moon, rising around 2:00am, may interfere with the fainter meteors this year.

Read more

__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard