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Post Info TOPIC: Timor Sea Crater


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Mount Ashmore
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Based on the structure of the dome, called Mount Ashmore, there were two obvious explanations for its formation: from a mud volcano or from the movement of tectonic plates.
But using a barrage of tests including scanning electron microscopy and seismic surveys, as well as chemical analysis of the rocks, Glikson concluded that the dome was the result of an asteroid crashing into the Earth at such speeds that it caused the Earth's crust to rebound

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RE: Timor Sea Crater
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New Crater May Have Helped Create Antarctic Ice Sheet

An enormous impact dome has been discovered lounging idly under the Timor Sea. The approximately 50 kilometre-wide dome is evidence that a huge asteroid collided with the Earth around 35 million years ago.
But this space rock wasn't alone. Numerous impact structures from the same time period are speckled across the planet. From the 85 kilometre-wide impact basin in the Chesapeake Bay off the Virginia coast to a 100 kilometre-wide impact in Siberia and bits of debris scattered like buckshot across much of North America, there is evidence that a huge swath of the globe was pelted by extraterrestrial material.

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Australian scientists have discovered a crater deep beneath the Timor Sea made during a heavy meteor storm which may have altered the Earths climate, the lead researcher said yesterday.
Australian National University archaeologist Andrew Glikson said seismic activity led experts to the Mount Ashmore 1B site, and a study of fragments showed a large meteorite hit just before the Earths temperatures plunged.

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The crater in the Timor Sea - about 300km off the NT coast - is yet to be measured but is believed to be at least twice as large as the central dome.
Scientists from the Australian National University discovered the crater after oil company geologist Dariusz Jablonski first suspected an impact may have created it.
Planetary Science Institute's Dr Andrew Glikson examined drill chips taken from the dome in 1980 and found they came from an asteroid crater.

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Ed ~ it should be noted that the asteroid sizes quoted in the article are incorrect.

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RE: Timor Sea Crater
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Evidence of a massive crater, at least 50 km across, has been discovered under the Timor Sea and may help scientists explain a rapid cooling of the planet 35 million years ago.
The new findings, announced today and published in the Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, suggest that the impact could have contributed towards the formation of the Antarctic ice sheet.

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fohn9.gif

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Fohn 1

Latitude: 11 0'42.99"S, Longitude: 12710'34.05"E

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Title: Origin of the Mt Ashmore structural dome, west Bonaparte Basin, Timor Sea
Authors: A. Y. Glikson, D. Jablonski, S. Westlake

New insights into the 3D structure, composition and origin of the Mt Ashmore dome, west Bonaparte Basin, Timor Sea, are enabled by reprocessed seismic-reflection data and by optical microscopic, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses of drill cuttings. The structural dome, located below a major pre-Oligocene post-Late Eocene unconformity and above a ~6 km-deep-seated basement high indicated by marked gravity and magnetic anomalies, displays chaotic deformation at its core and a centripetal kinematic deformation pattern. A study of drill cuttings of Lower Oligocene to Lower Jurassic sedimentary rocks intersected by the Mt Ashmore 1B petroleum-exploration well reveals microbrecciation and extreme comminution and flow-textured fluidisation of altered sedimentary material. The microbreccia is dominated by aggregates of poorly diffracting micrometre to tens of micrometres-scale to sub-millimetre particles, including relic subplanar fractured quartz grains, carbonate, barite, apatite and K-feldspar.

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An Australian scientist has discovered a 50 kilometre-wide dome buried deep beneath the Timor Sea was created when a huge asteroid struck about 35 million years ago.
Andrew Glikson says the Mount Ashmore impact off Australia's northwest coast occurred at the same time as asteroids struck Siberia and the United States.

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