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Seven years ago today: Eruption in Eyjafjallajökull, the volcano with the un-pronounceable name

Early morning April 14 2010 one of the most consequential eruptions of Icelandic history began, when the Eyjafjallajökull volcano, hidden beneath the glacier bearing its name, erupted. Although the eruption was relatively small it had profound consequences, shutting down air-traffic over much of Northern Europe and helping to jump-start the tourism boom which pulled Iceland out of the deep economic recession Iceland had found itself in following the 2008 financial crash.
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Iceland volcano ash cloud triggers plankton bloom

The 2010 Icelandic volcanic eruption, which disrupted European flights, also had a "significant but short-lived" impact on ocean life, a study shows.
Ash from the Eyjafjallajokull volcano deposited dissolved iron into the North Atlantic, triggering a plankton bloom.
 
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 Musician explains volcano's name



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Iceland, Eyjafjallajökull



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Volcanic ash air shutdown the 'right' decision

Concerns about aircraft safety during the eruption of an Icelandic volcano in 2010 were well founded, according to a new scientific study.
Ash particles from the early phase of the eruption were small and abundant, posing a potential threat to aircraft flying through the cloud.
Such particles could have melted inside jet engines, potentially causing them to fail mid-flight.

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One year on, Iceland volcano sleeps

When Iceland's Eyjafjoell volcano began acting up a year ago, no one could foresee the small eruption would soon lead to the planet's largest air space shutdown since World War II.
Today, ash still covers a wide area around the blast site, which still bears the label of volcanic hazard area and European officials continue to scratch their heads over how they will avoid similar chaos if such an eruption happens again.

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In 2004 the European Union imposed a clear and unlimited duty of care upon every airline based in the EU. If your flight is cancelled or delayed by more than a few hours, the airline is obliged to provide you with appropriate meals and accommodation. You must also be given transport between the airport and the hotel and two telephone calls or emails (or, if you prefer prehistoric means, two telex messages or faxes). These obligations apply regardless of the cause of the delay or cancellation. In effect, the airlines are insurers of last resort. And the same regulations apply to non-European airlines when flying from airports within the EU.
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Scientists think they can now explain the sequence of events deep inside the Earth that led to the major volcanic eruptions on Iceland earlier this year.
Using data from satellite radar, GPS, and seismometers, the group has sketched a blueprint for the "plumbing" underneath Eyjafjallajokull.

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It is four months since the eruption of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano, which played havoc with flights and travel plans across Europe and beyond.
Now, hikers are once again walking on the slopes of the crater, where they are discovering some dramatic changes to the landscape - even new 'mountains' created by the eruption.

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Close-up footage of the crater at Eyjafjallajökull. You can see red glowing lava as well as volcanic bombs flying through the air. If you watch carefully you can even see the shockwaves of the eruptions in the ash cloud.

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Experience Iceland's newest Volcanic craters

The recent eruptions have created two brand new volcanic craters and a new lava field in Iceland and visitors can get up close and personal on a three-day trekking tour.
The new craters and lava field, located at Fimmvörduhįls, have been christened Magni and Módi, after the sons of Thor, the Norse God of Thunder.

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In Norse mythology, Móši (anglicised Módi or Mooi) and Magni are the sons of Thor. Their names mean "Angry" and "Strong," respectively. Rudolf Simek states that, along with Thor's daughter Thrśšr  ("Strength"), they embody their father's features.
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