* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: BD+20°1790 b


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
BD+20 1790b
Permalink  
 


Youngest Extra-Solar Planet Discovered

University of Hertfordshire astronomers, Dr Maria Cruz Gálvez-Ortiz andDr John Barnes, are part of an international collaboration that has discovered the youngest extra-solar planet around a solar-type star, named BD+20 1790b.
The giant planet, six-times the mass of Jupiter, is only 35 million years old. It orbits a young active central star at a distance closer than Mercury orbits the Sun. Young stars are usually excluded from planet searches because they have intense magnetic fields that generate a range of phenomena known collectively as stellar activity, including flares and spots. This activity can mimic the presence of a companion and so can make extremely difficult to disentangle the signals of planets and activity.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: BD+20°1790 b
Permalink  
 


Youngest planet orbiting a star like our Sun is found by British astronomers

Astronomers have discovered the youngest planet orbiting a solar-type star outside our solar system.
The giant planet is 35 million years old and six times the mass of Jupiter, according to astronomers. Our planet is more than 100 times more ancient at 4.5billion years old.
Named BD+20 1790b and situated 83 light years away from Earth, it is the youngest planet orbiting a star of a similar size to our Sun.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Title: Evidence of a massive planet candidate orbiting the young active K5V star BD+20 1790
Authors: M. Hernán-Obispo, M.C. Gálvez-Ortiz, G. Anglada-Escudé, S.R. Kane, J.R. Barnes, E. de Castro, M. Cornide

BD+20 1790 is a young active, metal-rich, late-type K5Ve star. We have undertaken a study of stellar activity and kinematics for this star over the past few years. Previous results show a high level of stellar activity, with the presence of prominence-like structures, spots on the surface and strong flare events, despite the moderate rotational velocity of the star. In addition, radial velocity variations with a semi-amplitude of up to 1 km/s were detected. We investigated the nature of these radial velocity variations, in order to determine whether they are due to stellar activity or the reflex motion of the star induced by a companion. We have analysed high-resolution echelle spectra and also two-band photometry was obtained to produce the light curve and determine the photometric period. Based upon the analysis of the bisector velocity span, as well as spectroscopic indices of chromospheric indicators and taking into account the photometric analysis, we report that the best explanation for the RV variation is the presence of a sub-stellar companion. The Keplerian fit of the RV data yields a solution for a close-in massive planet with an orbital period of 7.78 days. The presence of the close-in massive planet could also be an interpretation for the high level of stellar activity detected. Since the RV data are not part of a planet search program, we can consider our results as a serendipitous evidence of a planetary companion. To date, this is the youngest main sequence star for which a planetary candidate has been reported.

Read more (320kb, PDF)

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Scientists discover youngest planet orbiting solar-type star

Astronomers have discovered the youngest planet orbiting a solar-type star outside our solar system, they said today.
The giant planet is 35 million years old and six times the mass of Jupiter.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

An international team of astronomers, including two from Hertfordshire, has discovered the youngest planet outside the solar system.
The planet, named BD+20 1790b, is only 35 million years old, making it approximately three times younger than the next youngest planet, at 100 million years old.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

BD+20°1790 b is an extrasolar planet, orbiting the 9th magnitude K-type star BD+20°1790, 25 parsecs from Earth. This planet is six and a half times more massive than Jupiter or about half the mass of the lowest limit being a brown dwarf.
Read more

__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard