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Title: The Drake Equation as a Function of Spectral Type and Time
Author: Jacob Haqq-Misra, Ravi Kumar Kopparapu

This chapter draws upon astronomical observations and modelling to constrain the prevalence of communicative civilizations in the galaxy. We discuss the dependence of the Drake equation parameters on the spectral type of the host star and the time since the galaxy formed, which allow us to examine trajectories for the emergence of communicative civilizations over the history of the galaxy. We suggest that the maximum lifetime of communicative civilizations depends on the spectral type of the host star, which implies that F- and G-dwarf stars are the best places to search for signs of technological intelligence today.

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Drake Equation 55 Years Old

Frank Drake had a problem. It was the fall of 1961, a year after his pioneering SETI experiment: Project Osma. Using an 85-foot antenna in Green Bank, West Virginia, Drake had unfurled the intriguing possibility that we might find proof of intelligent beings by simply eavesdropping on their broadcasts. He had spent several weeks pointing his antenna at two nearby stars, tuning a simple receiver to 1420 MH, hoping to detect transmissions.
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Title: A joint analysis of the Drake equation and the Fermi paradox
Authors: Nikos Prantzos (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris and Universite P. et M. Curie)

I propose a unified framework for a joint analysis of the Drake equation and the Fermi paradox, which enables a simultaneous, quantitative study of both of them. The analysis is based on a simplified form of the Drake equation and on a fairly simple scheme for the colonization of the Milky Way. It appears that for sufficiently long-lived civilizations, colonization of the Galaxy is the only reasonable option to gain knowledge about other life forms. This argument allows one to define a region in the parameter space of the Drake equation where the Fermi paradox definitely holds (Strong Fermi paradox).

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Calculating The Odds of Intelligent Alien Life

Could there be intelligent life on other planets? This question has piqued imagination and curiosity for decades. Explore the answer with the Drake Equation -- a mathematical formula that calculates the possibility of undiscovered life.



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Compelling evidence suggests we are not alone in universe

Astronomers fiddling with the Drake equation have come up with wildly varying estimates for ET civilizations in our galaxy, from millions to none (Drake himself estimated 100,000). But this month the odds became a bit less rubbery. Working from a miniscule section of the sky, the Kepler Space Observatory has revealed data on 1,235 potential extrasolar planets, with 54 in the life-friendly "Goldilocks Zone" (not too hot, not too cold). There may be up to 50 billion planets in our galaxy alone, astronomers say.
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Why haven't we found aliens yet?

The question of whether or not we are alone in the galaxy is one that has fascinated everyone from mathematicians to conspiracy theorists.
But, if extra-terrestrial life forms are abundant in the Universe - as some people believe - why have they not been in contact?

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The Search for Life: The Drake Equation is on BBC Four, Tuesday 14 December, 2000 GMT

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The famous American astronomer and astrophysicist Carl Sagan explains the Drake equation.
The Drake equation (rarely also called the Green Bank equation or the Sagan equation) is a famous result in the speculative fields of xenobiology, astrosociobiology and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence.

The Drake equation states that:
N = R* x fp x ne x fl x fi x fc x L, where:

N is the number of civilizations in our galaxy, with which we might hope to be able to communicate;

R* is the rate of star formation in our galaxy
fp is the fraction of those stars that have planets
ne is the average number of planets that can potentially support life per star that has planets
fl is the fraction of the above that actually go on to develop life at some point
fi is the fraction of the above that actually go on to develop intelligent life
fc is the fraction of civilizations that develop a technology that releases detectable signs of their existence into space
L is the length of time such civilizations release detectable signals into space.

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A man studying in London has taken a mathematical equation that predicts the possibility of alien life in the universe to explain why he can't find a girlfriend.
Peter Backus , a native of Seattle and PhD candidate and Teaching Fellow in the Department of Economics at the University of Warwick, near London, in his paper, " Why I don't have a girlfriend: An application of the Drake Equation to love in the UK ," used math to estimate the number of potential girlfriends in the UK.

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