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Mbozi Meteorite Discovery


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Latitude:  9° 7'0.01"S, Longitude: 33° 4'0.01"E

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The 16 ton Mbozi (also known as Mbosi) meteoric iron, was discovered in Tanganyika Territory, Tanzania  in 1930, and is one of the world's largest meteorites.

The Mbozi meteorite has no crater.
Mbozi has been long known to locals, who call it kimwondo, yet became known to outsiders only in the 1930s.

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Weighing in at a cool twelve tons, the irregularly shaped Mbozi Meteorite - which lies on the southwestern slope of Marengi Hill, 70km west of Mbeya off the road to Tunduma - is the world's eighth largest known.
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Title: Mbosi: an anomalous iron with unique silicate inclusions
Authors: Olsen, Edward J.; Clayton, Robert N.; Mayeda, Toshiko K.; Davis, Andrew M.; Clarke, Roy S., Jr.; Wasson, John T.

The Mbosi iron meteorite contains millimetre size silicate inclusions. Mbosi is an ungrouped iron with a Ge/Ga ratio >10, an anomalous property shared with the five-member IIF iron group, the Eagle Station pallasites and four other ungrouped irons. Neither the IIF group nor the four other ungrouped irons are known to have silicate inclusions

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Title:
The Mbosi meteoric iron, Tanganyika Territory.
Authors: D. R. GRANTHAM, Ph.D., A.R.S.M. and FRANK OATES, B.Sc., A.R.S.M., A.I.C.

The meteorite is situated on the western slope of Marengi Hill, about 150 yards from the top of the hill and close to the boundary of Mr. Jennes's farm. This place is 10 miles south-east of the Mbosi mission station in Rungwe (formerly Langenburg) district. The latitude and longitude are approximately 9°7' S., 33°4' E. The locality lies between Lakes Tanganyika and Nyasa, south of Lake Rukwa, and about 23 miles from the border of Northern Rhodesia.
The country-rocks are gneisses with marked parallel banding, containing much felspar and penetrated by pegmatite stringers. The view that these rocks are of sedimentary origin is strengthened by the presence of a dark quartzitic gneiss with occasional streaks of limonite. A fresh, coarse-grained quartz-dolerite crosses the top of the hill.
The meteorite lies exposed for some 2 feet above the surface of the ground. It was buried 2 or 3 feet deep in a red loamy quartz rubble, which is covered by a few inches of soil. Beneath the mass is about a foot of rubble overlying the disintegrated gneiss.

Source (PDF)

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