* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: Ulawun Volcano


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Ulawun Volcano
Permalink  
 


Papua New Guinea disaster officials are on alert as one of the country's highest active volcanoes shows signs of an eruption.
Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Rabaul Volcano
Permalink  
 


As of the 5th of April, the Global Volcanism Network (GVN) has reported that RVO reported that eruptions continue at Rabaul volcano in Papua New Guinea. During the week of 27th March to 2nd April there were occasional strong ash emissions from Tavurvur crater, accompanied by roaring noises. A crater glow was visible at night. Ash fell over Rabaul town on 2nd April, and drifted SE on other days. Generally, deflation was measured at the caldera, but there were periods of inflation during the past 2 weeks. People are advised to stay at least 2 km from the volcano due to risks from explosive activity.

Source

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Rabaul Volcanic ash
Permalink  
 


Rabaul's Volcanological Observatory says up to 40 centimetres of volcanic ash covers much of the Rabaul township and surrounding communities.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Rabaul Volcano
Permalink  
 


Rabaul Volcano, a pyroclastic shield in the New Britain area of Indonesia, emitted a plume of ash and steam on May 29, 2008.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Mount Tavurvur
Permalink  
 


Mount Tavurvur near the provincial capital Rabaul on the Papua New Guinea island of New Britain, erupted at 8.45 a.m. (22:45 GMT Friday) with a blast which shattered windows up to 12 kilometres from the caldera and sent an ash plume 18 kilometres into the air

"It was quite scary, but it's quieter now and has quietened considerably through the day" - Steve Saunders, Rabaul Volcanological Observatory chief surveyor.

In 1994, a large eruption on Mt Tavurvur and the nearby Vulcan peak destroyed much of Rabaul, covering the airport and much of the town with ash, and forcing the construction of a new capital, Kokopo, 20 kilometres away.
Papua New Guinea's Mining Department said in a volcano bulletin that ash was falling on Kokopo, causing power and phone cuts.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Rabaul Volcano
Permalink  
 


Disaster officials, in Papua New Guinea, have evacuated as many as 250 families from villages near a volcano which scientist fear could erupt.

The volcano near the town of Bialla on the island of New Britain is being monitored by staff from the Rabaul Volcanology Observatory, they’ve found high levels of tremors in the area which could indicate a eruption is near, however no thermal activity within the volcano has been detected.

Source

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Ulawun Erupts
Permalink  
 


Three volcanoes Langila, Ulawun, and Rabaul in Papua New Guinea’s West New Britain erupted simultaneously on August 9, 2005, spewing ash at the same time, though not all with the same results.


Expand

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying on the Terra satellite captured this image of the island of New Britain.
The westernmost volcano, Langila, and the easternmost volcano, Rabaul, send fairly faint plumes of ash into the air, both of which drift toward the northwest. Ulawun, the most active volcano in this picture, spits out a dense stream of ash that flows straight south.
The volcanoes’ proximity to each other and propensity for acting up at the same time suggest that they could be affected by the same tectonic activity underground.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Langila Volcano
Permalink  
 


Three volcanoes in Papua New Guinea’s West New Britain province spewed ash on June 21, 2005.


Expand (1.41Mb)

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying on NASA’s Aqua satellite, captured this image of Langila, Ulawun, and Rabaul the same day.
At the time MODIS captured this image, Langila showed the biggest plume of volcanic ash, followed by Ulawun. Both volcanoes are enlarged below the main image. In all cases, winds pushed the ash clouds to the northwest, over the ocean.

Unlike ash from a wood fire, volcanic ash is neither soft nor fluffy. It consists of hard, abrasive particles of glass and rock that pose serious health hazards to humans and livestock.

Langila, Ulawun, and Rabaul regularly supply the local neighbourhood with ash and excitement. Langila is one of New Britain’s most active volcanoes, and has produced mild or moderate explosive eruptions recorded since the 19th century.

Recorded eruptions of Ulawun date back to the 18th century, with large eruptions generating lava and pyroclastic flows occurring since 1970.
Before 1994, Rabaul’s caldera sheltered New Britain’s largest city, but the city had to be temporarily abandoned after powerful simultaneous eruptions of nearby Vulcan and Tavurvur Volcanoes.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Since June 2, 2005, Langila Volcano, in Papua New Guinea’s West New Britain province, has erupted continuously.


Expand (2.32MB)
Image Acquired: June 13, 2005

The volcano has discharged unusually heavy loads of ash. Initially, winds carried the ash clouds northward over the ocean. Changing winds, however, have begun returning the ash to the island.

Approximately 10,000 people live in the volcano’s vicinity, in a remote area where radio communication is unreliable and access is only by boat or helicopter.






__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Ulawun Volcano
Permalink  
 


Ulawun Volcano
A wispy plume of steam rises from the Ulawun volcano on the Papua New Guinean island of New Britain in this photo-like Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image.


Expand (2.8MB)

The image was taken by NASA’s Terra satellite on June 6, 2005, as the volcano was exhaling ash and steam.
Ulawun is one of Papua New Guinea’s most active volcanoes. It rises to a height of 2,334 metres on the northwest shore of New Britain, making it the highest volcano in the Bismarck Islands.



The Ulawun stratovolcano is the highest volcano of the Bismarck arc, and one of Papua New Guinea's most frequently active.
Ulawun rises above the North coast of New Britain opposite Bamus volcano. The upper 1,000 m of the 2,334-m-high volcano is unvegetated.
A steep-walled valley cuts the NW side of the volcano, and a flank lava-flow complex lies to the South of this valley.
Historical eruptions date back to the beginning of the 18th century. Twentieth-century eruptions were mildly explosive until 1967, but after 1970 several larger eruptions produced lava flows and basaltic pyroclastic flows, greatly modifying the summit crater.



__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard