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Post Info TOPIC: Bloody Creek reservoir


L

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RE: Bloody Creek reservoir
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The Bloody Creek crater is approximately .5 km in diameter and formed in granite in south-western Nova Scotia. There is a near-continuous rim which supports the theory this is a meteor impact site. The rocks around the crater show evidence of the incredible shock wave that occurred through the force of the impact. The age of the crater is currently undetermined but two possibilities exist. The shallow depth could be an indication that this is an older crater that has been eroded, ice resulted in dissipation of the impact energy resulting in the shallow craters shape. The Bloody Creek structure is the only recognized on-shore impact crater in Atlantic Canada and one of only three low angled craters known to exist in the world.
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L

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Bloody Creek Crater
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The naming of the crater candidate is still not official. The site lies between Bridgetown and Dalhousie West, Nova Scotia, on what was formally a section of Bloody Creek. Although the designation Bloody Creek Crater seems natural, Dr Stevens prefers to call it the ASTRID Crater, which comes from his label for it of Aerial-Photo Sixty-Two Recent Impact Doublet. However, his daughter also happens to be named Astrid, so his choice of name is hardly unbiased.
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L

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Bloody Creek reservoir
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Google earth file: Bloody Creek Crater.kmz (1kb, kmz)

Latitude: 4444'59.98"N, Longitude: 6514'35.00"W



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L

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Called the Bloody Creek structure, the 10-metre deep crater is formed in granite, making it all the more important because, unlike in other rock, only an impact could have produced such elliptical features

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Acadia University researchers are studying a meteorite crater south of Bridgetown, with the possibility of proving other meteors came down here thousands, if not millions, of years ago.
The group led by Ian Spooner, an environmental geo-scientist in the earth and environmental science department, published a paper in the journal "Meteoritics and Planetary Science" earlier this month.
It outlines details of the elliptical impact crater about one kilometre in circumference at Bloody Creek reservoir, a small lake on South Mountain, about 20 kilometres from Bridgetown.

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